Install Ceiling Fan Using WireMold Solution

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  #1  
Old 06-16-04, 02:48 PM
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Install Ceiling Fan Using WireMold Solution

I'm planning on installing 2 ceiling fans in 2 bedrooms and I want to use the matal raceway solution that is being offered by WireMold. This will be the first time I've done something like this so I'm still in the planning phase.

However, I wanted to know, after watching the video about the ceiling fan installation on WireMold.com, they are not cuting a whole in the wall to mount the box rather using only the circular fixture box mounted to the outside of the wall to the joist in the ceiling. Is this safe and strudy enough to hold the average ceiling fan? Just as with the video, I too do not have a current fixture in the ceiling so everything will be new including wires that need to be run.

In the video, they used the wires from a socket/outlet to the ceiling fan which ment they have to add a switch in the middle to be able to control the fan. I was also wondering if it would be possible to just run the wires starting from an existing switch directly to the fan rather than from a socket/outlet then to a switch then to the fan. There is a switch in our bedrooms that operate a scoket/outlet on the opposite side of the wall (i.e. for a standing lamp). Could I run the wires in the switch directly to the fan?

Thanks for the help
 
  #2  
Old 06-16-04, 03:59 PM
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If there is an attic above this room, I would encourage you to skip the Wiremold and do the job properly. It isn't harder to put the wire inside the wall--it is just a bit scarier.

A fan-rated metal junction box mounted to the bottom of the joist with some long screws is a very strong attachment. It should be fine.

Starting the wiring from an existing switch is the source of many DIY errors. If there are two black wires and two white wires in the switch box, then this is probably doable. If there is only one black wire and one white wire in the switch box, then forget that idea (unless you're willing to give up switching what the switch currently switches). If this is a 3-way switch (i.e., the switch lever is blank rather than saying "on" and "off" on it), then starting at the switch might be an even worse idea.

Running wiring inside the wall is like going off the high dive. It's only scary until you've done it once. And the result is ever so much more satisfying.
 
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Old 06-16-04, 05:35 PM
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Unfortunately I live in a condo and the attic is not an option. I'm on the top floor and there is a small space above, but it does not cover the entire ceiling so that would not be an option.

As for giving up with the switch currently switch, that would be ok with me. Currently the switch controls one outlet on the other side of the room. I currently have a lamp plugged in so that I can have light when I flip the switch. The fan that I plan on installing will be a fan/light combo so the lamp-outlet setup will be a thing of the past.

Considering what you said, I'll have to take a look at the switch to see what wires are currently connected and that will get me going.
 
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Old 06-16-04, 06:31 PM
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After further investigation, I found that on the switch, there are 3 white wires, 3 black wires and 1 purple. 1 white, 1 black and 1 purple wire are all coming from below the switch while the other 2 white and black wires split off paring up 1 white and 1 black, going to the top of the switch. The reason for the split is because I guess since there are two outlets that are controlled by the switch a pair of white and black wires are going to each.

All 3 white wires are twisted together and running in there seperate directions, while all 3 black wires are going to the same screw on the switch. The 1 purple wire is also connected to the bottom of the switch.
 
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Old 06-16-04, 06:54 PM
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The answer to your other original question is that yes, you can certainly choose to run your Wiremold to the switch rather than the receptacle. If you put three insulated conductors plus ground inside your Wiremold, you could even replace that simple switch with a duplex switch and have separate switches for the fan's motor and the fan's light if you want.

Do you live in Chicago?
 
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Old 06-16-04, 07:41 PM
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Well, south suburbs of Chicago in Alsip.

What I want to happen is when I flip the switch to on, the light come on. When I pull the chain for the fan, the fan comes on. When I flip the switch to off, the fan and light go off.

Switch -> controls on/off to entire system (fan and light)
Fan Pull Chain -> controls fan on/off ability depending on state of switch
Light Pull Chain -> controls light on/off ability depending on state of switch

example -> the switch is on and the light is off (light pull chain), but the fan is going (fan pull chain).

In my old house this is how it work, but I never looked at the wiring.
 

Last edited by twodaend; 06-17-04 at 08:13 AM.
  #7  
Old 06-20-04, 07:38 PM
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I'm having a bit of trouble finding the ceiling jost, is there a better method than just poking around with a nail?

How secure will it be to just mount to the bottom of a joist using the fan rated box from wiremold (B4F)? I heard it would be ok, but a lot of people have been saying to get a fan brace and mount between joist rather than directly to a joist. Howerver I will not be able to gain access to the ceiling considering I live in a condo with not access to the ceiling.
 
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Old 06-20-04, 08:30 PM
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Buy an electronic stud finder at your home center. That will find the joist for you.

Securely mounting the box to the bottom of a joist is as strong a connection as you can make.
 
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Old 06-25-04, 08:01 AM
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Ok, i'm getting close to being ready to start this project. I went to the store to starting pricing what I need and pretty much have an idea, however, I'm stuck on what wire to get. Wiremold says,
Use THHN wire. Do not us ROMEX- type or any other cable-sheathed wires - they are not designed to make sharp bends through raceway elbows.
Here are more reccomendations. THHN wire comes as a single cooper wire which means I will have to buy at least 3 and they are quite expensive.

Before knowing wiremold's recommendations, I read through some other post here and found someone doing something similar and was advised to use a brand called Southwire-ROMEX (not sure if they were using wiremold though). I was going to get a 100' roll because I will be doing two rooms and the price was not all that bad, however for the THHN the price was more and times 3.

I see that the ROMEX is a cable and it already has the 3 copper wires in it. I'm not sure, but would I be able to strip the outside yellow cable and use the 3 wires inside or will I have to break down and get the 3 rolls of THHN wire? I'm not 100% sure what the difference's are between the ROMEX and THHN wire are so that may be what is confusing me.

I checked the circuit breaker and it says 20amps so I'll need a 12 gague wire. Correct me if I'm wrong.
 
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Old 06-25-04, 09:52 AM
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THHN is not that expensive. The cost is peanuts compared to what you're going to pay for the Wiremold. What price are you looking at for 12-gauge copper THHN?

Southwire is the name of the company that owns the Romex trademark. There's nothing special about Southwire Romex. It's just Romex.

You may not strip all the sheathing off of Romex and use the individual wires. They are not rated for that use. Even if you did, it would be a lot of work and hard not to damage the conductors.

Yes, because the breaker is 20 amps, you need 12-gauge copper wire.
 
  #11  
Old 06-25-04, 11:45 AM
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The ROMEX was about $30 for 100' roll while the while the THHN was $30 each and I need 3 if i'm correct.

Where would be a good place to go and is there a particular brand possible. When I checked the pricing for the wiremold, it was not all that expensive at least not as much as I though it would be. I checked with Menards and they were less than expected, I'll check Home Depot as well since they are close to me.
 
  #12  
Old 06-25-04, 07:50 PM
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That price for THHN is too high. You should be able to get 500 feet for the price you quoted for 100 feet.
 
  #13  
Old 06-25-04, 11:19 PM
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After checking Home Depot, I found that a 100' roll of THHN wire was about $10 must have been looking at something else. So that means I'll get a black, white and green roll. However, I saw two types of THHN wire, solid and stranded. Should I be looking to choose one over the other and if so, which one?
 
  #14  
Old 06-26-04, 09:40 AM
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You may use either one. The solid is more difficult to bend, but easier to connect at the ends. It is probably a bit cheaper, isn't it? I'd probably recommend the solid, primarily because there's a better chance you'll make good connections. And good connections are critical.
 
 

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