Ceiling fan push hot air back down

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Old 02-18-05, 04:37 PM
gojfb1
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Question Ceiling fan push hot air back down

I am burning a wood fireplace insert in a room with high catheredal ceilings and obviously the heat rises. We have not been using our ceiling fan in this specific room. Does any one know if the ceiling fan is run at the correct blade rotation that it factually will push the hot air down to the living area? If so, what rotation is correct?
 
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Old 02-18-05, 04:48 PM
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Hello...basically HEAT rises so you want the blades in the fan to be blowing DOWN to bring the heat that is above back down to be reheated. Many people have different views on this but the fact HEAT rises you have a pocket of heat high up that needs to be recirculated down...

Hope this helps.
 
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Old 02-18-05, 10:36 PM
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Conventional wisdom is to have the fan blow up in the winter. If you have it blow down, the hot air will come down through the center of the room, but you'll feel the breeze and you may not like that. If you have it blow up, the air will be forced down along the walls, which will still get the hot air down without creating a breeze where you are.

But anyway, try it both ways and see which way you like it better. It doesn't make that much difference. You may find that you don't like to run the fan at all in the winter.
 
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Old 02-19-05, 07:31 AM
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OK so this may sound wrong but I just did a seminar with a expert in the feild of energy savings and what he called button up the house for savings. I can't remember the guys name but he suggested having it blow down versus the old theory...because of the rising heat and air flow of the air blown down from a fan....causing the hot air to be pushed down....again to be allowed use beyond the initial heating that caused it to rise...

His reasoning was that a fan does not blow straight down...it blows out and down as in a magentic style field....( not sure I agree with it but thats what he said) and moves the air in the winter better as we as it is more dense in his terms.....

I will get the guys name as I know he has some articles on the internet somewhere about energy conservation...may be a quack..I dont know but we listened and put our fans blowing down and it seems to push more hot air around...

Now he did say if the ceiling fan is in a living room lets say and a stairway is next to it and a basement that may have a gas logs or so on....versus full house heating...he suggested to blow the fan UP in the case and it will pull the heat from the gas logs in the basement.....

So it really depends on what you are trying to do I guess.....lol
 
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Old 02-19-05, 10:55 AM
gojfb1
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Ceiling fan blowing downward...

I certainly appreciate ALL of the wisdom. Firstly, I want to try to blow the fan DOWN. Is this when - if I stand under the fan and look up toward the blades, the blades will be turning COUNTER-clockwise? I can be so dumb when it comes to something like this.
 
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Old 02-19-05, 11:42 AM
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Not every fan has the blades tilted in the same direction. Rather than try to figure out whether blowing down means clockwise or counterclockwise, just try it. If it's blowing on you, it's blowing down.

If you really want to figure it out without turning on the fan, look at the blades. One side of each blade will be closer to the ceiling. The other side will be closer to the floor. A fan blows down then the side closest to the ceiling leads the side closest to the floor as it goes around.

Looking up at the fan in my family room just now, a counterclockwise rotation (viewed looking up) means the fan is blowing down.
 
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Old 02-26-05, 08:06 AM
gojfb1
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Appreciate all of the suggestions, but I've tried both ways. Honestly, I do not think either way helps.
Spring is coming!
 
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Old 03-02-05, 11:12 AM
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I have some factual experience with this as I have a woodburning stove in my living room, but I'm sure results will vary depending on room layout, size and amuont of heat produced by the stove/fireplace.
Basically, as someone else said, try it in both directions and see what you prefer.
In my living room, about 20x15 with 8 fot ceilings, I have a medium sized stove (produces about 45,000 BTU's according to the paperwork) against one of the shorter walls. In the center of the room is a ceiling fan and on the side wall is the thermostat, about 14 feet from the stove. I also have thermometers in the room off the living room and upstairs.
The stove does a great job of heating the living room, but it takes a little while to initially heat it up. When using the ceiling fan, in either direction, the living room and the adjacent rooms/upstairs heat up much more quickly. My experience is that the heat is disperesd a little bit quicker with the fan in reverse and with the fan blowing up rather than down, you don't feel a cooling breeze, even though warmer air is being circulated.
Another difference in your situation may be how close to the ceiling is your fan. If it's on a downrod, it may not be close enough to the warm air on the ceiling when it's blowing down.
 
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Old 03-03-05, 05:39 AM
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This is a highly debated subject, always has been.
I used to sell fans and have been installing them longer than I care to remember. Every room is different. What works in one area may not work in another. High cathedral ceilings are the most varying.

In my experience there is NO cooling/heating, winter/summer, direction. This is a complete fallacy. Speed is the determining factor in bringing heat down from a high ceiling. I have been in wharehouses with fans and hot air furnaces hanging from the rafters. There was so much heat at the ceiling even with the fans on high I could feel hot air blowing on me standing underneath.

In a home the difference is not so drastic. With high ceilings I suggest a downward airflow at a low to medium speed. This way no breeze is felt and the heat is gently "pushed" down. This works better with cathedrals.

With flat ceilings and the fans in upward direction, again usually slow speed, the warm air is displaced by cooler air being drawn up. The warm air is pushed down the walls of the room as the cooler is drawn into the center.
 
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Old 01-06-09, 11:22 PM
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Thanks Speedy Petey, your suggestion worked perfectly. I have a two story and my second floor was burning up in the winter while the first floor was freezing. Setting the living room fan to blow down keeps the second floor from over heating while keeping the first nice and warm. My master bedroom is down stairs and that too had issues, as soon as the furnace shut off, it would freeze. I set the fan there to blow upwards and the room feels a lot warmer for longer. I do feel a slight breeze but its not cold.
 
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Old 01-07-09, 07:38 AM
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Now that everyone has settled rather the fan should blow up or down let me tell you how to know, without turning the fan on ,which way it will blow. Look at the switch on the fan that determines direction. If the switch is up the air flows up. If the switch is down the air flows down. All fans I own or have ever owned are this way.
 
 

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