Replacing Switched Outlet with Light/Fan


  #1  
Old 02-27-05, 03:15 PM
ghandler
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Replacing Switched Outlet with Light/Fan

I have a room that has no overhead light and 1 switched outlet. I want to install a fan/light and use a new fan/light wall switch while removing the outlet from being controlled by the switch. Although I have seen this asked and answered before, my wiring seems to be different.
I have installed the new fan/light and have run 14/3 from the fan/light to the switch box. Here is the rest of the wiring:

There are 3 sets of wires in the switch box not including the new 14/3. There is a black/white bringing the power in, a black/white going somewhere I don't know, and a black/white/red going to the outlet recepticle. The 3 blacks are connected, and the 3 whites are connected. The old switch had a black wire that was connected up to the other blacks (making 4 connected together), and a red wire that was connected to the red wire going to the outlet.

In the outlet recepticle, the black/white/red comes in from the switch and two black/white wires go out. I assume that they go to power other outlets in the room that are always hot. In the outlet box, the 3 blacks are connected and the 3 whites are connected. The outlet itself is connected with the red wire from the switch and with a white wire to the other 3 whites.

The new fan/light switch has 3 wires: black, red and blue.

I'm not sure if all these wires and colors have given me this headache or maybe it is just from hitting my head against a roof rafter when installing the fan box. Can anyone help with the wiring? Thanks - Gordon in NJ
 
  #2  
Old 02-27-05, 04:24 PM
J
Member
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: United States
Posts: 17,733
Upvotes: 0
Received 1 Upvote on 1 Post
Excellent description. The fact that you can present this information so clearly will lead to a swift resolution.

You can leave the receptacle box alone. No need to make any changes there.

At the switch box, you now have four cables:
  • The black/white power feed ("P").
  • The black/red/white cable to your receptacle ("R").
  • The "other" black/white cable ("D").
  • The new black/red/white cable you just installed to your ceiling ("F").
For each cable, I'll used "b" to refer to the black wire, "r" to refer to the red wire, and "w" to refer to the white wire. I won't mention the grounding wires, but I'm sure you know what to do with them.

I'm sure your switch came with some instructions that identified what the black, red and blue wires were for. Because you didn't tell me that, I'm going to guess. If my guess is wrong, you can modify accordingly. I'm guessing that the black wire is the power feed, the red wire is switched power for the fan motor, and the blue wire is switched power for the fan light.

At the switch box:
  • Connect Pb to Db to Rb to Rr to the black wire from your switch (or whichever switch wire is identified as the power feed). This makes your receptacle always hot without even changing the receptacle wiring. It also make sure that all downstream loads get power (on cables D and R).
  • Connect all white wires (Pw, Dw, Rw, Fw) together. These are all neutrals. They do not connect to the switch.
  • Connect Fb to the red wire from your switch (or whichever switch wire is identified as the switched hot for the fan motor). At the fan end of this cable, you'll connect this black wire to the fan motor hot wire (which is black on most fan models).
  • Connect Fr to the blue wire from your switch (or whichever switch wire is identified as the switched hot for the fan light). At the fan end of this cable, you'll connect this red wire to the fan light hot wire (which is blue on many fan models, and black with a white stripe on other fan models.
 
  #3  
Old 02-28-05, 07:56 AM
ghandler
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Thanks John, your directions were great. Everything works perfectly.

I really appreciate your quick and detailed response.

Gordon
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: