Feed-Through Cord Switch

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  #1  
Old 03-13-05, 10:20 AM
Ruby
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Feed-Through Cord Switch

Can anyone tell me how to install this? I have a puck light that needs a switch and I bought a feed through switch that was easy with instructions. You split the cord then cut one of the wires in half and fed it into the switch. Very easy, but the switch was too small and broke in half. So I bought a larger one but the setup is different and it didn't come with instructions. I just don't know how to install the wires, and I've already cut one of the wires in half.

Help?

The switch I bought is this:http://doityourself.com/store/4540894.htm
 
  #2  
Old 03-13-05, 10:30 AM
J
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Your post already did a good job of explaining how to install these switches. Where exactly are you having trouble?
 
  #3  
Old 03-13-05, 10:36 AM
Ruby
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The first, smaller switch was simple: you fed the cord in and one side just fed through, and the other side (that you cut in half) fit into a little thing so the two halves were facing one another.

But this switch is different, and has some screws. Do I need to strip the cut wires and wrap around those screws? The smaller switch involved no stripping, just one snip.
 
  #4  
Old 03-13-05, 10:43 AM
J
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It clearly has screws that hold one half of the switch to the other half. Does it have more screws inside that are not visible from the outside?
 
  #5  
Old 03-13-05, 10:48 AM
Ruby
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There is a very tiny screw or something that is difficult to see unless you flip the switch away from it. It's copper. It's so tiny that I can't tell if it's a real screw or just the thing holding parts together. (I'm not very knowledgeable on electrical stuff; I'm sure you can tell!)

Thanks so much for your continuing help!
 
  #6  
Old 03-13-05, 10:55 AM
J
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If the screw is that small, it's not for making a connection. Once you take it apart, it is apparent that there are points that pierce the wires? Unlike the smaller switch, you may need to separate the two wires inside the cord a bit.
 
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Old 03-13-05, 11:04 AM
Ruby
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No, there are no points. The first one had those points,but this one only seems to have the large screws.

The on/off is different, too. This one is a flip switch. The first one was a little plastic wheel that you turned.
 
  #8  
Old 03-13-05, 11:09 AM
J
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Now I'm confused. I asked about screws and you said there was only a tiny one. Now you mention large screws. Can you clarify? How many? Where? What color?
 
  #9  
Old 03-13-05, 11:18 AM
Ruby
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Ooops, sorry. I thought you were asking if there was some kind of grounding screw.

Inside, there are no points, but are two largish metal screws. It looks like the top part of the wire (the puck light cord split down the middle into two wires, ridged and smooth) should feed right through like on the other switch. but instead of the points and a place to insert the wire I cut in half previously, there are these two screws. It looks like I should strip some of the cord plastic off and then wrap the cut piece of wire, both ends, around those screws, but since I've never done this before and there were no instructions, I didn't want to just do it and then start a fire.

I've read things about grounding wires and wasn't sure if that was something to worry about or not. Also, without instructions,I'm just having to assume that the same wire I cut in half is the same wire I would wrap around those screws.

The smaller switch I started with was just a lot easier because it only involved splitting the cord in the spot you wanted to put the switch, and then snipping the one wire in half, then sticking them in place. Unfortunately, where you fed the original cord in was too small for the cord, and when I tried to force it, it broke in half. So I went back to Lowes and bought the bigger size. This one seems a lot more complex to someone who doesn't really know what she's doing, and I'm afraid to make a mistake for fear of burning down the house.

 
  #10  
Old 03-13-05, 11:29 AM
J
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The term "ground" has no place in this discussion. The cord has no ground. The switch has no ground. Forget about ground.

The two screws inside are the two contacts for the switch. Strip about 3/8" off the end of each end of the wire you cut (which I really hope was the smooth wire and not the ribbed one). Wrap each end clockwise around the screws and tighten. Let the ribbed wire pass through uninterrupted.

Although the other switch was easier to install, you're better off with this one. The screws will make ever so much better connections than the wire piercers.
 
  #11  
Old 03-13-05, 11:36 AM
Ruby
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LOL, maybe a better connection, but you don't know my history of wire stripping. It's not pretty, and always involved trying to hook up speakers and stereo equipment. Let's just say that if I would start out with 20 feet of cable, by the time I finished, I had about two feet left.

(Please don't tell me there's a tool for a dollar that strips wires; I use wire cutters and try not to cut all the way through. If there's a tool, I'll cry.)

Okay, I'm off to attempt this...cross your fingers, and thanks for your help. I'll report back.

And then it's time to get out the POWER SAWS!!! (kidding)
 
  #12  
Old 03-13-05, 11:37 AM
Ruby
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Oh, I did check, and I had cut the correct wire. The instructions were very good on the first switch, just bummer that I broke it.
 
  #13  
Old 03-13-05, 11:47 AM
J
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Of course there's a tool for stripping wires. It's called, interestingly enough, a "wire stripper". You should never strip wire with wire cutters. You never want to nick the metal in the wire because that creates a hot spot. Go buy a wire stripper before doing this project. It's just a few bucks.
 
  #14  
Old 03-13-05, 11:57 AM
Ruby
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Too late. But I was ULTRA careful and didn't get the wire. I used a rusty set of wire cutters that I hadn't touched since the 80s, and DID IT!!!

It works!

yeah, I hear the groans out there, I really do. If I decide to do any other electrical things, I'll buy the tool. However, I tend to avoid electrical stuff because I'm afraid of them. The puck light should have had a switch on it to begin with, but didn't.

Thank you so much for your help...couldn't have done it without you!
 
 

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