New Light Spur

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  #1  
Old 05-09-05, 11:15 PM
T
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New Light Spur

I currently have one light (seems to be end of run) and one switch, and want to put up some wall lights with the switches side by side in a new partition wall.

I then want to install another light in the new hallway I've just created.

My question is do I take the feed from the light fitting or the switch - or does that depend on the current wiring? Im pretty ok at understanding electrics and have recently done some work such as hooking up a new feed from the fuse box to the dishwasher, and new recepticles/hood etc, but have never had to do this before.

Any help would be appreciated. Thanks in advance.
James
 
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Old 05-10-05, 06:59 AM
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Tobja,

May need some more information on this to be able to assist you.


You refer to the switch box.....you are going to have to determine if the power comes into the light fixture of the switch box.

Can you post how many wires are in the switch box and how they are connected to the switch itself.

Is the switch you are refering to have a single pole switch or a 3 way switch in it.

You need to determine this because if the feed ( as we call it ) or supply is feeding into the switch box then you need only tap that box to feed the new switch box you are wanting to add and wire accordingly.

However, you also need to know what is on the circuit you are wishing to tap into......how many things are on it and where it is located.

If you can post more information in detail I am sure the members here will chime in and help assist you.....

Also do you have a voltmeter, you need to find out again if the power is feeding through the light or the switch box.
 
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Old 05-10-05, 11:30 AM
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Originally Posted by tobja
I currently have one light (seems to be end of run) and one switch, and want to put up some wall lights with the switches side by side in a new partition wall.

I then want to install another light in the new hallway I've just created.

My question is do I take the feed from the light fitting or the switch - or does that depend on the current wiring?
It depends on where the power source is.You will need to find a source of unswitched power for new lights. If you want them to be controlled by the exisitng switch you can take the feed from the existing light.
Originally Posted by tobja
Im pretty ok at understanding electrics and have recently done some work such as hooking up a new feed from the fuse box to the dishwasher, and new recepticles/hood etc, but have never had to do this before.

Any help would be appreciated. Thanks in advance.
James
 
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Old 05-10-05, 09:28 PM
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Thanks for replying. I will check tomorrow and post back on here.

On first view I think there's one cable going to the switch so the power must be going to the light. As stated I will check.

Thanks again.
 
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Old 05-11-05, 04:33 PM
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I checked and the switch has one cable going to it, black, white and ground.

On the feed I have this light in the back room, then it goes into the kitchen (light/fan) then to the dining room (light with 6 bulbs) then upstairs to the middle and front bedrooms where there is a total of 4 sockets (with no ground).

I was going to jump those 4 sockets off the landing socket as it has earth. There doesn't seem to be too much running off that line.

The house is quite old so the wiring is all over the place.
 
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Old 05-11-05, 06:06 PM
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Originally Posted by tobja
My question is do I take the feed from the light fitting or the switch - or does that depend on the current wiring?
James
Based on this statement.

Originally Posted by tobja
I checked and the switch has one cable going to it, black, white and ground.
You need to take power from the light. The switch is wired as a switch loop. There is no neutral in the switch box.
 
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Old 05-11-05, 08:58 PM
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So does that mean I take the connection from the light to my new light (hot and neutral as coloured), then to the switch as it currently is on this one?

To add an extra problem the light I want to put in is actually 2 separate wall lights to work on one switch.

Sorry to be a pain in the butt, can you tell me how to wire this? Many thanks again.
 
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Old 05-12-05, 07:43 AM
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Once you tap power from the existing light (connecting to the power feed cable--black to black and white to white), you have a choice. You can go to the switch first and then to the light, or to the light first and run a switch loop to the switch. Whereever you go to first would be where you continue from to the next light/switch pair.
 
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Old 05-12-05, 01:50 PM
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Ok excellent thanks a lot I'll give it a go.

One last question, is it ok to put these 2 vanity lights on it that Im connecting, and then go and put another light in the newly ceated hallway (from a stud wall that I just put up)?

In all I will have the hall light, the 2 vanity lights (either side of a mirror), the main bathroom light, then the kitchen fan/light, then the dining room light (and 4 recepticles connected at the moment that Im going to jump off another feed).
 
  #10  
Old 05-12-05, 04:43 PM
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Lights don't use much power. Receptacles can use anywhere from no power to all the power on a circuit. Only you know what you're going to want to plug in. Add up all the wattage of all the bulbs, subtract it from 1800, and you'll know if you have enough watts left to run the vacuum cleaner.

And depending on where these receptacles are, this may or may not be a code violation. So where are they?
 
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Old 05-12-05, 05:04 PM
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Is 1800 an average figure or the figure to use?

The recepticles are in the middle and front upstairs bedrooms. They have no ground so I want to run them off another feed which (I think) doesn't have too much running off it. Is 1800 watts still the same rule for recepticles?

Im sure this house is one big code violation. I moved in 6 mths ago and am trying to replace old for new but do it correctly.
 
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Old 05-13-05, 12:23 PM
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You are not allowed to extend an ungrounded circuit.

1800 is the number to use if you have a 15-amp circuit.
 
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Old 05-15-05, 07:44 PM
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If I replace the cable running to the fuse box will it be 12/2 I need to use?

Also I just opened up the back room light box and its the old 2 wire material type cable but someone then ran new white cable with ground to the switch.

Im definitely looking to fit recessed lighting soon.
 
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Old 05-15-05, 08:27 PM
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On a 20-amp circuit, use 12/2. On a 15-amp circuit, use either 12/2 or 14/2.
 
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