jumping power on a single pole switch

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  #1  
Old 06-12-05, 03:00 PM
jamdanaur
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jumping power on a single pole switch

i have a bedroom that has a switch that controls only an outlet. the switch is a single pole with black/white and ground wire.
i put in a ceiling fan and dropped wire to the switch (which was accesible from the back through a closet). however, matching b/w wires i get no power at all.
someone at the hardware store said to jump power, but i guess i missed somethign because joining both black wires with a third that went back to the switch just made it such that the ceiling fan turned on the lamp plugged into the outlet.
i cannot access the outlet, as far as running a line from the fan to it, so how can i accomplish getting this single pole switch to still control the outlet and fan- or is it possible to establish steady power to the fan while having the switch continue to control the outlet.
thanks for your help!!!
james
 
  #2  
Old 06-12-05, 03:17 PM
J
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If you are willing to give up the switching of the receptacle (making it permanently live), this project will be extremely easy. To give you the details, we need two pieces of information. First, tell us whether the switch controlled only one half of the duplex receptacle, or both halves. Then shut off the breaker, gently pull the receptacle out of the box without disconnecting anything, and tell us everything you see (number of cables, number of wires in each cable, and how everything is connected).
 
  #3  
Old 06-12-05, 03:28 PM
jamdanaur
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wow what a quick response!
the outlet is in the wall such that the prong openings are on top and and the ground plug is underneath.
the left side of the plug has a white wire on top with the bottom empty
the right side has the black wire on the botton with the top empty.
thanks again for your help.
james
 
  #4  
Old 06-12-05, 03:44 PM
J
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That's not the answer I was expecting.

I need to know all the cables that are in both the switch box and the receptacle box.

So far, you have mentioned one black wire and one white wire in the switch box, and one black wire and one white wire in the receptacle box. That cannot be all. In one box or the other or both, there are more wires. I need to know about them too.
 
  #5  
Old 06-12-05, 04:09 PM
jamdanaur
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the outlet only has the one wire as described. the switch box also has only the one wire that originates from the outlet.
i've added 12/2 wire to the switch box so that it now has 2 black, 2 white and 2 grounds.
this room is at the end of the house as far from the electric box as can be. i've heard that perhaps this is an end of the run situation.
thanks again for your help.
james
 
  #6  
Old 06-12-05, 04:30 PM
J
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If the one cable runs from the outlet box to the switch box, then where's the power come from?

Did you pull the receptacle out of the box so you could clearly see behind it?

If indeed there is only one cable at the switch box, and one cable at the outlet box, then there is a junction box somewhere else where these two cables come together. You need to find that box. Perhaps the switch controlled more than one of the receptacles in the room?
 
  #7  
Old 06-12-05, 05:32 PM
jamdanaur
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john,
this outlet is behind a bed which because of all the crap in this room it was hard to get a good look. a closer look reveals two 12-2 lines coming in, the black from on and the white from the other go to the outlet. the other two lines are together in a nut cap.
hopefully this is more of the response that you were after.
looking forward to your help.
james
 
  #8  
Old 06-12-05, 07:10 PM
J
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Yes, that is the answer I was expecting.
  1. Shut off the breaker.
  2. At the receptacle box, remove the wire nut connecting the black and white wire. Connect the black wire to the remaining brass screw (next to the other black wire) and connect the white wire to the remaining silver screw (next to the other white wire).
  3. At the switch box, connect both white wires to each other. Connect the two black wires to the two screws on the switch.
You're good to go.
 
  #9  
Old 06-14-05, 05:17 AM
jamdanaur
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John,
Thanks for your help, the fan is up and running. Now....this is a Hampton Bay fan, we have a few up already and we've had good luck with them.
This one has a hum to it, the instructions say to allow a 24 hour break in period, which is not yet over, but I have a question about the ground wires.
First of all, our home has aluminum wiring (I know) and obviously I was working with copper. The outlet and switch are both co/al. When I took the switch out of the wall, the ground wire was not attached to the switch. The two grounds at the outlet were connected so I left them alone. I joined the copper and aluminum ground and attached them to the ground screw on the switch while at the fan I joined the fan's ground to the copper ground from the 12/2 and capped them. Does that sound right, and if not how would I rectify this and could an issue with grounding contribute to the hum- which only occurs when the fan is going and decreases as the fan is turned down to lower fan settings. The light does not produce any noise at all.
Thanks again.
James
 

Last edited by jamdanaur; 06-16-05 at 05:07 PM.
 

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