6/3 NM wiring allowed for range?


  #1  
Old 10-31-05, 12:35 AM
biver
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6/3 NM wiring allowed for range?

As background, I am familiar and comfortable with 12 and 14 gauge wiring for various projects throughout the house.

Now, I am remodelling/rewiring an old kitchen in which armored cable feeds the 50A range outlet.

When rewiring this range circuit, do I need to use armored cable as before, or can I use NM cable? If NM, is any other protection or sheathing required by most codes? I will be pulling this through wood framing, if that matters. There will be a recessed outlet, with no exposed wiring (except on the approach to the circuit breaker panel).

My local superstore has 6-3 NM Romex with what appears to be stranded conductors (as opposed to the solid conductors in the more familiar 12 or 14 gauge Romex I have previously installed. The 6-3 has black exterior NM sheathing and they will cut it for me to order.

I have 7/8" auger drill bit on hand, looks like it will be a good fit.

Any and all advice appreciated.
thanks
 
  #2  
Old 10-31-05, 08:11 AM
C
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If your town allows romex in houses (most do, some don't), then you can run 6/3 NM for the range.

Make sure it is really 6/3 +G - which will have a red wire, black wire, white wire and a ground wire either bare or green. Old stoves didn't require the fourth wire - new ones do.
 
  #3  
Old 11-04-05, 08:46 PM
biver
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6 AWG with 10 AWG Ground???

The wire I am looking at now has 3 conductors that are 6 gauge, and 1 ground conductor that is 10 gauge. The 6 AWG conductors look stranded - composed of 7 smaller wires about 14 gaugem or so. The 10 AWG ground is a single wire conductor.

Did I buy the wrong stuff?

Since it is the job of the ground conductor to carry an errant electrical current back to the source, I can't imagine a 10 gauge ground doing this for an errant current from one or two 6 gauge conductors.
 
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Old 11-04-05, 09:02 PM
C
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Originally Posted by biver
The wire I am looking at now has 3 conductors that are 6 gauge, and 1 ground conductor that is 10 gauge. The 6 AWG conductors look stranded - composed of 7 smaller wires about 14 gaugem or so. The 10 AWG ground is a single wire conductor.

Did I buy the wrong stuff?

Since it is the job of the ground conductor to carry an errant electrical current back to the source, I can't imagine a 10 gauge ground doing this for an errant current from one or two 6 gauge conductors.
That's the right stuff.

The ground wire only has to be large enough to allow enough current to flow to trip the circuit breaker in the event of a fault. The #10 is large enough for this purpose.
 
 

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