Ceiling fixture stays on

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  #1  
Old 11-10-05, 09:30 AM
joenovice
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Ceiling fixture stays on

I just replaced an older chandelier with a new er fixture...
The light stays, existing dimmer switch won't turn it off.
This is how I wired it...

There are two pairs of black/white wires, I connected one pair to the standard lamp wire and the other the same way. The breaker dosn't get tripped at all.

What am I doing wrong??

Thanks!
 
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  #2  
Old 11-10-05, 09:44 AM
J
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I connected one pair to the standard lamp wire and the other the same way
What exactly does this mean?
 
  #3  
Old 11-10-05, 09:52 AM
joenovice
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light

Existing wiring has 2 black wires & 2 white wires. The fixture has standard lamp type wire (silver) and ground.
 
  #4  
Old 11-10-05, 10:01 AM
J
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So let's take this one wire at a time:
  1. To what did you connect the ceiling black wire from pair #1?
  2. To what did you connect the ceiling white wire from pair #1?
  3. To what did you connect the ceiling black wire from pair #2?
  4. To what did you connect the ceiling white wire from pair #2?
 
  #5  
Old 11-10-05, 10:03 AM
joenovice
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Originally Posted by John Nelson
So let's take this one wire at a time:
  1. To what did you connect the ceiling black wire from pair #1?
  2. To what did you connect the ceiling white wire from pair #1?
  3. To what did you connect the ceiling black wire from pair #2?
  4. To what did you connect the ceiling white wire from pair #2?

bk/wh pair to one lamp lead
bk/wh pair to the other lamp lead

Sorry If I didn't explain clearly...
 
  #6  
Old 11-10-05, 10:15 AM
J
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You connected the black and white from the same cable to each other. That should have blown the breaker.

Any chance you remember how the old fixture was connected?

There's a pretty good chance your dimmer is fried. I suggest you go buy a simple single-pole switch and put it in in place of the dimmer until you get this problem resolved. Once it works fine with the regular switch, then you can swap in the dimmer.

Do you own any electrical test equipment? If not, I suggest you spend $2 on a simple neon circuit tester.
 
  #7  
Old 11-10-05, 10:22 AM
joenovice
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I don't remember how the previous lamp was wirded.
Stupid ???
What is the CORRECT way to wire.
Again, there are 2 black & 2 white wires.
The lamp has two standard leads...and ground.
Sorry, but I'm clueless.

I then try to use a single pole switch and swap with a new dimmer.
 
  #8  
Old 11-10-05, 11:08 AM
J
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You probably have a switch loop. You need to open the switch up and confirm you have a white and a black connected tothe dimmer switch. If you do then you connect the power black the switch white. Then connect the the fixture to the two remaining black and white wires.
 
  #9  
Old 11-10-05, 11:55 AM
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Most dimmer switches have three leads: two hot wires and one ground. The hot wires (usually black) will be attached to the hot wires in the box. One should go to the service entrace (or the rest of the circuit) and the other should be the switched line going to the fixture itself. The ground should be connected to the bare copper ground in the box (assuming there is one). The neutral wires (white) should probably be wire-nutted together in the box, not connected to anything on the dimmer. However, you said this dimmer is existing, which means you shouldn't have to do anything to it.

In the ceiling fixture, as far as I can tell it sounds like you have more than one fixture on the circuit. I can't think of any good reason why you would have a hot wire and a neutral wire connected together. If you have more than one light fixture on the same circuit, then the black wires should be connected together along with one of the lamp leads. Similarly, the white wires should be connected together with the other lamp lead. This would allow the switched hot wires to go elsewhere in the circuit and provide (or not provide) power to another fixture.

If you only have one fixture on this switched circuit, I'm a bit confused. Basically, simply wiring the new fixture the same way as the old one should provide the same function.
 
  #10  
Old 11-10-05, 05:49 PM
J
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If this one switch controls more than one fixture, then flintsilver7 is probably right. But if this one switch controls only one fixture, then joed is probably right. If you tell us the colors of the wires connected to the current switch, we'll know which situation you have.

flintsilver7, it seems that you are not familiar with switch loops.
 
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