2X4 vs. metal bracefor fan box?

Reply

  #1  
Old 11-27-05, 07:33 PM
G
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Pleasantville, NY
Posts: 552
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
2X4 vs. metal bracefor fan box?

Not exactly an electrical question, but this relates to ceiling fans so I thought I'd try.

I planning an installation of a ceiling fan and I thought I'd center it in the room, which would locate it between 2 ceiling joists. I have access to the ceiling from the attic and I thought I'd attach a fan box to a wood 2X4 then attach the 2X4 betweenthe joists. Or, would it be better to use a metal frame to run between the joists?

Thanks in advance.
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 11-27-05, 09:26 PM
J
Member
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: United States
Posts: 18,497
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
The advantage to the fan brace kit is that it can be installed from below, that it is adjustable, and that it aligns itself for height, and can be adjusted for box position between the joists. But it costs about $20.

The advantage to the 2x4 is that it costs almost nothing. But you have to climb into the attic to install it, probably multiple times (once to measure for it, once or more to go up and find out you didn't cut it just right, and once more to install it).

The 2x4 is probably stronger (especially if you put it in with 16-penny nails), but the fan brace kit is strong enough anyway.

If you use the 2x4, be sure to buy a fan-rated box.
 
  #3  
Old 11-28-05, 04:45 AM
G
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Pleasantville, NY
Posts: 552
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
2X4 vs. metal brace for fan box?

Thanks John.
 
  #4  
Old 11-28-05, 10:00 PM
C
Member
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Yorba Linda, CA
Posts: 338
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Hint: Install the 2x4 with long deck screws.

They're much easier to install in an attic than long nails are.
 
  #5  
Old 11-29-05, 06:36 AM
J
Member
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: United States
Posts: 18,497
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I agree with that hint. Predrill the holes for the 3" deck screws to make them go in easier. All the force is shearing force, so you can afford to drill a large enough hole to make the screw go in easily. This also makes it easy to back them back out if you need to redo anything.
 
  #6  
Old 12-01-05, 08:03 AM
G
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Pleasantville, NY
Posts: 552
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks for the suggestion regarding the use of deck screws versus nails.

Any reason why deck screws versus 3" course-thread, general construction screws?
 
  #7  
Old 12-01-05, 08:17 AM
J
Member
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: United States
Posts: 18,497
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
They're roughly equivalent. They probably have different shank thicknesses, and thus have different shearing strengths, but this application isn't going to stress them very much anyway. The shank diameter on either one is less than a 16d nail. If you're worried about it, put three of them in each side for a bit extra strength.
 
  #8  
Old 12-01-05, 09:37 PM
C
Member
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Yorba Linda, CA
Posts: 338
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by GaetanoL
Thanks for the suggestion regarding the use of deck screws versus nails.

Any reason why deck screws versus 3" course-thread, general construction screws?
I use deck screws for nearly everything brecause I like the way the special bit (it comes in the box) grips the screw head. The heads don't strip out as easily as the heads in most other screws.
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: