Basement Lighting

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Old 11-30-05, 02:56 PM
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Basement Lighting

I am planning to turn my partially finished basement into a work studio. The Ceiling is already boarded and insulated and is about 7' with varying utilities slightly below. I plan on leaving the brick walls as they are and put some lamenate for the floor.

What type of fixtures should I go with? I am thinking flouresent t12 48" surface mounted .
What is a quality brand? Since it will be a work area I need a lot of good broad quality light.

Is there a certain ballast I should get and what about the kelvin?

thanks for the info
deacon
 
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Old 11-30-05, 07:32 PM
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Fluorescents will give you the most light for your buck. There are many good brands, but I would stay away from the cheaper plug-in type shop lights. You may also want to add some tasks lighting also.

The T12 type lamps are being phased out for energy conservation reasons. T8's are the new replacement. T8's will use less electricity while light output is increased over the t12's.
 
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Old 12-02-05, 06:40 AM
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thanks for the info pc,

I thought that although t-8's used less energy there lumen output was less than the 12's. Possibly just miss information I picked up on the web.

I've been checking out the Sylvania F48
deacon
 
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Old 12-02-05, 09:28 AM
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flourescents are the bestbet there... easy to install and give a good clean light. and use enough lights. Personally, I hate areas - aspecially work areas and kitchens that are not very well lit. It stinks alwyas standing in your own shadow, so make sure your placement is ok too. The problem with poor lighting is that you adjust and over time just get used to it.

Oh, and where youll have specific work areas like a workbench or something like that, the lights that are on adjustable/swivelable arms are great. Especially if they are halogens.
 
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Old 12-06-05, 11:52 AM
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thanks rk

Are there any specific rules I should look for when laying out the lighting. The ceilings are a 7 feet and the space is about 25'x45'. Also are there any issues with the possible cold of the basement and the floresents? If so what is a good brand to get for these conditions

also are reflectors a good idea? do they help?
deacon
 

Last edited by the deacon; 12-06-05 at 01:53 PM.
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Old 12-12-05, 11:00 AM
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bump bump bump
 
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Old 12-12-05, 12:47 PM
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It depends on what "work" will go on in this work studio. If the work demands accurate color renditions, then your requirements are much stricter than most applications. If the work requires very quiet conditions, then you need to pay attention to the sound ratings on the ballasts. If the temperatures will be below 55 degrees, then you might need cold weather fixtures. If none of these apply, then you can just buy cheap fixtures at Home Depot. For most applications, I'd probably get the ones with diffusers over the bulbs. However if this is a woodworking shop, you could probably just use shop lights.
 
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Old 12-12-05, 04:50 PM
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It will be a clothing studio so color rendition is somewhat important for fabrication. Also the quiter the better. It should'nt be below 55, at least when it is in use. What are good bulbs for color rendition?

thanks for the info
deacon
 
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Old 12-12-05, 05:08 PM
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Most large home improvement stores sell a variety of fluorescent bulbs, and have comparison charts to explain the differences. Buy the bulb with the highest Color Rendition Index (CRI).
 
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Old 12-14-05, 09:33 PM
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Originally Posted by the deacon
It will be a clothing studio so color rendition is somewhat important for fabrication. Also the quieter the better. It shouldn't be below 55, at least when it is in use. What are good bulbs for color rendition?

thanks for the info
deacon
For sound and color quality you'll want T-8 fluorescent fixtures with Phillips 951 lamps. 951's are fairly new, but are far and away the best lamp out there as far as color rendition. You'll have to order them - I'm not aware that any of the big retailers stock them. They're not cheap, but you won't be needing a lot of them.

They sell a T-8 fluorescent fixture at the big-box stores, but I've not been satisfied with them. I'd suggest getting fixtures from an electrical wholesaler or a lighting store - fixtures with electronic ballasts made by a reputable American manufacturer. I'd also recommend fixtures with diffusers on them for best light distribution.
 
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Old 12-16-05, 10:02 AM
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thanks for the great info. I'm looking into the grainger or slyvina fixtures with electric ballasts. I can't seem to find anything about the philips 951 lamps online.

deacon
 
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Old 12-16-05, 06:17 PM
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The TL90 lamps (#941, etc.) are brand new and (surprisingly, IMHO) are not in their online catalog yet. CRI (Color Rendering Index) for these lamps is 90+ - best I've seen. I know they are available because we just installed some. They might be worth asking for.

OTOH, the standard before this was the Philips TL80 line, shown here:

http://www.nam.lighting.philips.com/...uor.php?id=579

Readily available and enough better than a standard lamp that they are worth looking for. CRI is 85+.
 
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Old 12-19-05, 07:18 AM
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I'll ask around for them, the TL80's look pretty good if I can't come by the 90's.

thanks Chey

deacon
 
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Old 01-23-06, 11:38 AM
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Well I finally got the lighting up, it looks good and provides great work light. I went with Slyvania 32w 48" T-8's. I'm still looking for the Philips TL-90 lamps but have the 80's in right now and all is well.

Thanks for the help and advice

deacon
 
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