Need more light, compact fluorescent question.

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Old 02-26-06, 12:47 AM
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Need more light, compact fluorescent question.

We are remodeling our home and just replaced a fixture in our laundry room, it is a 3 bulb fixture that says to use a max of 60watt per bulb I believe. We thought 3 bulbs would give us enough, but it is pretty dark. I have never used compact florescent bulbs before and was wondering what they equal in standard Incandescent.

What would be the biggest and brightest bulb that would be acceptable to put in the fixture which states 60watts? Kind of confused about how you figure out the max bulb in the fluorescent and how bright it would make it over the 3 60 watt incandescent that are in there now.

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Old 02-26-06, 01:05 AM
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Hm, after trying to look up more information online I read that compact florescence cannot be used in enclosed fixtures.. The fixture in that room is an enclosed ceiling fixture.. So do we have any options at all at this point?

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Old 02-26-06, 08:14 AM
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What type of incandescent bulb were you using? At the same wattage, some are brighter than others. I would try bulbs with clear glass, not white. Three 60 watt bulbs should give pretty good illumantion. If not, maybe this wasn't the best choice in fixtures for your room.
 
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Old 02-26-06, 08:28 AM
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Originally Posted by kevinz
Hm, after trying to look up more information online I read that compact florescence cannot be used in enclosed fixtures.. The fixture in that room is an enclosed ceiling fixture.. So do we have any options at all at this point?
The caution is due to the location of the ballast or transformer which is then contained within the
fixture, away from the free air flow which allows the heat generated to be dissipated.
So, after facing this dilemma several years ago, in a similar ceiling mount fixture, I drilled several holes in the glass enclosure. This worked rather well but was laborious. Next I found some clear plastic rod (it also comes in several colors) and glued short pieces around the edge, extended the down rod the feral attaches the globe to, which also allows a larger lamp, as well as providing for the heat dissipation
4 yrs. and counting.
 
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Old 02-26-06, 08:31 AM
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Direct from the GE site. It depends on the fixture. I would check the package of several different manufacturers.

Compact fluorescent light bulbs may generally be used in enclosed fixtures as long as the enclosed fixture is not recessed. Totally enclosed recessed fixtures (for example, a ceiling can light with a cover over the bulb) create temperatures that are too high to allow the use of a compact fluorescent bulb
 
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Old 02-26-06, 04:59 PM
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Well, turns out I am an idiot. I was working in that room today and noticed it isn't totally enclosed. The top has a gap. I am assuming this is enough to say it is not enclosed?

The specs on it say bulb type A19 MED.

This is the fixture we are using:

Quozel DY1605ES
http://www.quoizel.com/myquoizel/pro...s.aspx?OID=155

The balls around the rim hold the glass down just a bit and that area is open to the bulbs.


Would it be ok to use CFL on this fixture then? If so with CFL, I could use any CFL upto 60watts right? Would like to get the brightest we can.
 
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Old 02-26-06, 05:47 PM
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Originally Posted by kevinz
Would it be ok to use CFL on this fixture then? If so with CFL, I could use any CFL upto 60watts right? Would like to get the brightest we can.
Sure. As I recall, a 100W CFL consumes only 21Watts of power.
Unlike a 60W incandesant, which consumes 60Watts of power.
 
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Old 02-26-06, 09:22 PM
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I looked at a package of 100w equivalent bulbs I have and they say 23 w. A 150 equivalent will still be under 60 w.
 
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Old 02-27-06, 01:34 AM
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Excellent, should be able to get plenty of light from 3 100s or even 150s if we need them.
 
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