How to hang a fan on a ceiling w/ exposed beams

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Old 05-16-06, 04:17 AM
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How to hang a fan on a ceiling w/ exposed beams

The condo I'm living in was converted over from an old warehouse a few years ago, and when they did so they left the 12ft ceilings and exposed wooden beams. Currently I have some track lighting in the living room which is mounted directly to one of the beams. A bundle of wires comes out of one of the walls near the ceiling and runs along the ceiling to the track lighting where it is connected. I want to replace this with a ceiling fan, but am not sure what is the best/proper way to do this. First of all, how should I go about mounting the fan? Can I just mount it directly to the beam like the track lighting is, or do I need to install it some other more complicated way. Also, can I just run the wire bundle directly to the fan or do I need to install some sort of junction box or something of that nature.

Please excuse my ignorance, I have absolutely zero experience with this sort of wiring and installation.
 
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Old 05-16-06, 05:52 PM
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I've done some more research and it looks like I'll be forced to mount a junction box to the beam and then the fan to the junction box. Am I correct in this assumption? If so, do I need to buy any special type of junction box, or will any of the metal boxes from home depot work?
 
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Old 05-16-06, 06:05 PM
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Originally Posted by findingemo
I've done some more research and it looks like I'll be forced to mount a junction box to the beam and then the fan to the junction box. Am I correct in this assumption? If so, do I need to buy any special type of junction box, or will any of the metal boxes from home depot work?
You must use a box rated to support a fan. Not sure if Home Depot carries them but they may.
 
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Old 05-17-06, 04:18 AM
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I think I've found what I need by searching lowes.com. I've found two different types of boxes however, some that appear to be directly mounted to the beam and other that consist of the box and a bar that spans between two beams. Does it matter which I use or is it a matter of personal preference?
 

Last edited by findingemo; 05-17-06 at 07:01 AM.
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Old 05-17-06, 11:10 AM
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The one with the bar is meant to be used on drywall ceiling where the fan would mount between the joists. You could I suppose use it in an open concept ceiling also although I would just mount a 2x4 and screw the fan to that. Use a box of course not direct connected to the 2x4
 
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Old 05-17-06, 11:27 AM
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Would there be anything wrong with just getting a normal metal junction box (rated for a fan) and mounting it directly to the bottom of a beam, then mounting the fan directly to that? So instead of having the fan between two beams, it would be mounted directly below one.
 
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Old 05-17-06, 04:10 PM
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Originally Posted by findingemo
Would there be anything wrong with just getting a normal metal junction box (rated for a fan) and mounting it directly to the bottom of a beam, then mounting the fan directly to that? So instead of having the fan between two beams, it would be mounted directly below one.
Sounds good. Just remember the fan "wiggles" in most cases because of imbalance. Balance the fan as well as possible and be sure to remember this when determining how to attach the box to the beam.
 
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Old 05-17-06, 04:40 PM
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My plan as of now (I'm sure things will change a bit once I start buying parts and actually do the installation) is to mount a junction box directly to the bottom of a beam, then install the fan to the box. I'll most likely be using a 3 meter downrod (my ceilings are 12ft). Does that sounds right? Also, other than making sure the fan is securely connected and balanced, are there other precautions I should be taking?
 
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Old 05-17-06, 06:00 PM
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Years ago I put in a gazillion (well..not quite, but...) ceiling fans in renovated loft apts. off of several stages of scaffolding. Now I haven't put one in in years. But one thing I would just check to make sure on, is that the canopy trim ring at the top, can slide up enough to cover an application where the ceiling box is not recessed. I am hoping it does, but I am not sure on this, unless someone else here is, on how most are made up top, these days.
 
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Old 05-17-06, 06:19 PM
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Is the canopy covering the box a purely aesthetic concern, or is it something that must be done? Thanks everyone, by the way, for your help.
 
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Old 05-17-06, 07:29 PM
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Originally Posted by findingemo
Is the canopy covering the box a purely aesthetic concern, or is it something that must be done? Thanks everyone, by the way, for your help.
Some may say it is merely asthetics but it acts as a cover for the box.

The make a 1/2 in deep box that should be able to be covered with the canopy.
 
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Old 05-18-06, 05:45 AM
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Is this the type of box you're referring to?

http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?actio...-CC&lpage=none
 
 

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