Ceiling Light - Heat Up

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  #1  
Old 10-29-06, 07:31 PM
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Ceiling Light - Heat Up

I have/had a small ceiling light where the halogen bulb was not working, so bought a new one and still didn't work. Thought maybe there was a loose wire so took the switch plate off the wall and saw no problems. Then removed the light in the ceiling to find that the wire connectors were slightly melted and looks like the fixture had heated up to the point that the wires were "crumbling" in my hand.

Did the aboveafter turning off the power at the box and have left it off.

I am not sure what caused this, although just had site finished hardwood floors put in my house and they went into the basement to connect their sander. Also, I had a dehumidifier plugged into the same "line" as well as some outdoor low voltage lights and outdoor post light. Seems that the line was overloaded somehow.

Is there any thoughts on how I determine the problem. Perhaps it was just due to the light fixture, but that fixture is rarely on and the house is newer (6 years old).

Not comfortable with turning the switch back on at the box until figuring out what caused it.

Thanks in advance for your thoughts and what I should do.
 
  #2  
Old 10-29-06, 07:54 PM
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Question

What type light fixture is this (recessed etc)?
What is the max watt lamp for it & what size lamp/s were in it?

Unlikely that the flooring played a roll.
As far as power draw goes, You would have a more wide spread problem.
 
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Old 10-29-06, 08:12 PM
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Light fixture was not recessed. flush mount to the ceiling with decorative part that comes down a couple inches.

max watt lamp is 150 watt/120 volt. Hard to see the letters on the bulb in the fixture, but it looks like it could be 160W. Builder put these lights in so figured they would be the proper voltage. The bulb itself does not look burnt out.

Rarley use that light and think the flooring guys may have had it on for a long period of time.

If the bulb was 160 W, would that have heated up the fixture to the point that the connectors started to melt?
 
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Old 10-29-06, 08:43 PM
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What type of wire was used to connect the fixture? There is a reason they specify 90C wire for some fixtures. If the wire was only the old lower rating and the fixture was improperly covered with insulation this could easily happen.
 
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Old 10-29-06, 08:57 PM
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Not sure what type of wire it is. How can I tell?
 
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Old 10-30-06, 03:27 AM
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Putting too high a wattage lamp could cause this problem.
 
  #7  
Old 10-30-06, 05:07 AM
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Thank you. I was worried that it was related to overload or some other electrical problem.

Do you think it would be safe to turn the power back on at the box to run the other items on tis circuit before I replace the light?
 
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Old 10-30-06, 06:17 PM
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Yes, as long as that fixture is not turned on the rest of the circuit should be fine.
 
  #9  
Old 10-30-06, 07:44 PM
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Thank you. I bought a new light today since the last one was toast.

Appreciate your help!
 
 

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