Light Bulb Question?

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Old 01-18-07, 05:35 AM
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Light Bulb Question?

I moved into a new home back in September. It seems all the bulbs in my house are lasting much shorter then they should be. I have replaced many 3 times already (4 bulbs total including the first round), and almost every fixture in the house has needed multiple replacements in the 4 month span. My question is how long do most bulbs last? And I have been buying the longest life rated ones I can find? Also is there a certain brand of bulb you guys can reccomend for durability so I can stop climbing ladders daily.

I have not noticed any other electrical problems in the house, no surges or anything. I just feel that somethings up and I shouldnt be replacing the bulbs on a monthly basis. Also just FYI I use all 60 watt bulbs in my fixtures.

Thanks!

Mark
 
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Old 01-18-07, 05:39 AM
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Are the bulb that are burning out from different stores, or did you buy them all at the same time?

Do you live near a railroad track or a highway or something else that might cause vibration to the house?

Have you measured the incoming voltage (on both legs of the 240) to see if you are seeing more than 125 volts or so on either leg?
 
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Old 01-18-07, 05:53 AM
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No I bought the bulbs from different stores and I have tried a few different brands. I think GE and Phillips?

I live in the center of our subdivision with no train tracks or highways near me.

I have no tested the socket voltage. I have never tested a socket before but I do own a voltmeter. If you could tell me what part to stick the leads too and what to set the voltmeter setting too I will check it tonight.

Thank you!

Mark
 
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Old 01-18-07, 06:51 AM
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I do not recommend testing at the socket itself. Instead, I recommend testing at a receptacle somewhere in the house. You need to set the meter for AC volts on a scale that will allow 120 volts to be displayed. Place one lead in each slot on a regular receptacle. Be sure to test each leg of your incoming 240 volt service.
 
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Old 01-18-07, 07:31 AM
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Ok so shove the black and red pins into the receptical holes once the voltmeter is set. Now when you say to test each leg of my 240 volt service what exactly do you mean? Sorry I'm a noob. And dont want to be thrown across the room... lol
 
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Old 01-18-07, 08:36 AM
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I do not recommend that you test the voltage on the light bulb socket itself because this is dangerous. It's too easy to accidentally short the probes together.

Your incoming electric service is 240 volts, supplied on three wires. Each leg is 120 volts with respect to the center tap neutral wire, which is grounded. The voltage between the two legs is 240 volts.

Devices in your house that work on 240 volts connect to both hot wires. Examples of this are water heaters and welders.

Devices in your house that use 120 volts, and this is most items, are connected to one of the hot wires and the neutral. About half the 120 volt circuits in your house use one leg, while the other half use the other leg.

Devices in your house that use 240 and 120 volts connect to both hot wires and to the neutral. Examples of these devices include electric dryers and electric ranges.

I am asking you measure the voltage on both hot legs, with respect to the neutral. I am suggesting that you measure at receptacles, as this is usually the easiest and safest place to measure. This means that you have to find two receptacles on different circuits in your house, and the two different circuit must be on different legs of the incoming service. The easiest way to do this is to find circuits that connect to adjacent breakers in your panel.
 
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Old 01-18-07, 09:04 AM
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Thanks so much for the help Bob, I will do it tonight and post my results tomorrow!!


Mark
 
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