Light Fixture requires 90-degree conductors

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  #1  
Old 02-13-07, 07:37 PM
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Light Fixture requires 90-degree conductors

Hi,

I just bought a replacement light fixture identical to the old one (single incandescent bulb, ceiling globe with insulation in the base, one white wire and one black wire).

However, the new fixture requires 90-degree conductors minimum. I already threw away the old fixture (DOH!). I can't determine if it required 90-degree conductors.

How do I determine if the conductors are compliant? If it helps, the can has two solid copper wires, one white and one black. It also has an exposed ground wire. Our condo was built in around 1981 in Southern California.

Thanks,
Rivkamar

p.s. I checked the cable in the crawl space. The following info was imprinted on the cable:

E42096 UNIFLEX TYPE NM 12/2 W6 (UL) 600V
 

Last edited by rivkamar; 02-13-07 at 08:00 PM. Reason: More information
  #2  
Old 02-13-07, 11:05 PM
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UPDATE:

After a little research, I know that the "Type NM" cables (No B) are rated for 60-degrees celsius which is the case with most older homes.

Since the heat from the bulb is the issue, could I simply use a 23W compact fluorescent bulb in the light fixture? It just barely fits inside the globe.

Better yet, what if I use a 40W incandescent bulb instead of a 60W? I'm reducing the wattage (=> power dissipation => heat generation) by two thirds. Therefore, wouldn't a two-thirds temperature derated supply conductor be acceptable?

Finally, out of curiosity, how is a 1982 60W light fixture different than a 2007 equivalent? Have the Type NM cables been causing fires? Is the 90 degree wiring requirement a reactionary change?

Thanks,
Rivkamar
 
  #3  
Old 02-14-07, 06:27 AM
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I do not understand what you mean by "the can has two solid copper wires". What can?

Obviously a 40 watt bulb produces less heat than a 60 watt bulb. However, you cannot use a 40 watt bulb and be guaranteed of being safe. Nor can you use a fluorescent light and have any guarantees.

If you have access to the wiring in the crawl space, then just install a junction box there. In that junction box join the existing old cable to a new piece of 12-2 NM-B cable. Run the new 12-2 to the light and you're done.
 
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Old 02-14-07, 08:58 AM
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racraft,

By saying can, I meant ceiling box.

Ugh, that's not what I wanted to hear. This light fixture is at the top of our stairs. The problem is the ceiling box is behind a couple studs and a plank of plywood covered with insulation from the crawl space. The stairs parallel the roof of our condo. I assume that's why the plywood and insulation is there. The cable was run through a hole in the plywood. I'm afraid this is going to turn into a Pandora's box situation. Every idea I have leads to complications.

Are there ceiling globe light fixtures available which don't have the 90-degree tolerant wiring requirement?

Thanks,
Rivkamar
 
  #5  
Old 02-14-07, 09:00 AM
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Yes, there are lights available that do not require 90 degree wiring.
 
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Old 02-14-07, 01:26 PM
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Most fixtures that do not require 90-degree wiring are those that hold the bulbs some small distance away from the ceiling.
 
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Old 02-14-07, 02:40 PM
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John and racraft,

That is exactly my problem. I can't tell if the fixtures do or do not require 90-degree wiring. It would be nice if the packaging had a "90-degree wiring" warning. As it stands, I have to make an educated guess, purchase the fixture and hope I don't have to return it.

Can anyone recommend a small, flush-mount ceiling light fixture without the 90-degree wiring requirement?

Thanks,
Rivkamar
 
  #8  
Old 02-14-07, 02:49 PM
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Try shopping at a lighting store.
 
  #9  
Old 02-14-07, 04:59 PM
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A flourecsent fixture would probably be OK. I would talk to a sales clerk in the store. Open the package if need to before you buy it.
 
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Old 02-14-07, 05:10 PM
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Manufacturers (of anything) are very reluctant to put anything on the outside of the box that might cause you not to buy their product. This is very frustrating for the consumer. I would encourage you to go ahead an open the box in the store before you buy it and read the stuff inside. Too bad if the store doesn't like it. Maybe they'll start putting pressure on their suppliers to put sufficient information out the outside of the packaging. At least it'll save you a return trip to the store.
 
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Old 02-14-07, 07:35 PM
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My flourecsent fixtures in my bath are marked 90 degree wire required. My house was built in 1980 and has 60 degree wire.
 
  #12  
Old 02-14-07, 11:05 PM
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Thanks to everyone for their advice and help. I am going to look for "60-degree" fixture. However, I did install the "90-degree" fixture as a stopgap. I have a 1 1/2 year old son. When we're taking him upstairs to bed, we need that light especially since my wife nearly face-planted last night. Since it's a long term issue of the insulation deteriorating, I'm not too worried. However, I do like to play it safe with electrical and plumbing issues.

Thanks,
Rivkamar
 
 

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