High or low voltage halogans?

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Old 02-25-07, 03:39 PM
J
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High or low voltage halogans?

Hi,

I'm installing halogan spot lights in my bathroom and was wondering wheather to go with high or low voltage bulbs? (I'm in Europe where it's 220V). Why would you use low voltage over high voltage, considering the extra hastle involved?

Also, would it be ok to install a standard spot directly over the shower cubical, or is there a particular type of humidity spot to use?

thanks in advance,
J
 
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Old 02-25-07, 10:06 PM
J
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I've never quite understood the attraction of low-voltage lighting. It doesn't make much sense to me. I believe that its popularity is related to the "quality" of the light. You should be able to view both at a lighting store and then decide for yourself. But unless you're really sold on the quality of the low voltage lighting, I'd say to go for line voltage. But it's a personal decision.
 
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Old 02-26-07, 05:12 AM
J
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Initially, Halogenbs were only available in low voltage packages, now the y are easily available is house voltage, so I agree, makes no sense to pay for the transformer.
 
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Old 02-26-07, 12:27 PM
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FWIW-
I believe in some areas of Europe, there can not be any line voltage devices in bathrooms. Someone may come along and refute this, however.
 
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Old 02-26-07, 01:04 PM
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Regarding lighting directly over a shower cubicle: In the states this is required by code to be a low-voltage type of light for safety reasons. The fixture and lens assembly must also be rated for wet locations (this means a gasketed lens not open to the shower). It's also a good idea (not sure if required, but it makes sense that it would be) to place this light on a GFCI protected circuit. The down side to all of this is that if you want to dim the light, you must use a special (higher-priced) dimmer to work with the low-voltage transformer.
 
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Old 02-26-07, 04:02 PM
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Lighting over a shower need not be low voltage according to the National Electrical Code of the U.S. It may be a local code in some places, although I have never heard of such a local code. There are, however, quite a few other restrictions on lighting over a shower or tub.
 
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Old 02-26-07, 05:42 PM
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let me step in for a min i kinda pretty famuiur with UK /Ierland area and there is a local code related to the shower cube area i just dont have the reguation book on hand as i am speaking.,

however i can concat my frenind he live in UK/Ierland area i am sure he will be glad to get the regualtion info what you are looking for

as far my memory serve me right the switch is located outside of the bathroom area

as far using the LV or line voltage lumiaires in bathroom there is a "zone" how far the lumiaire you can use but as i will speak again if you have to use the lumiaire above the shower stall [ cube ] you must use the lumiaire that rated for wet location or IP 55 or 65 [ not sure which one ]

as soon i get ahold of my freind to pass the word he will be glad to help you with correct infomation

[ I am famiur with both USA and France electrical system ]

Merci , Marc
 
 

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