Recessed light in Closet

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  #1  
Old 05-20-07, 09:14 PM
L
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Recessed light in Closet

Ok, well I already installed this before I found this forum, I tried to read as much as I could online and I also talked with the people that work at the local Big Box store.

After reading a few posts from here I realized that my install may not be correct or up to code. Heres what I did.

I installed a 6 inch recessed or pot/can light in my closet. I now understand open bulb may be wrong, the closet dimensions are 60Wx24Dx9H I installed an IC light because I have exposed joisting in the ceiling.

I wired it power 14/2 to switch and 14/2 to light. 2 separate cables, single gang remodel box. I apparently wired into what I thought was constant power from my kitchen cans. but in order for my closet light to work I need to turn on the kitchen cans. So I have to rewire that. seems they are run in series from the other 4 cans across the room, I have yet to verify this, although if I did have all 10 cans running off the 15 amp breaker, this seems to add up ok for 15 amps. Its an 8 month old house so every receptacle has a GFCI sticker on it.

Im sure the pros on here, after reading this post will tear things apart, what should be done to fix any mistakes I have made. The closet isn't used for clothes, but it does have a shelf, mind you though the ceilings are 9 feet in my house.

Thanks in advance
Gregg
 
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Old 05-21-07, 04:04 AM
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Closet lights require a covered bulb, but you can get glass cover trim rings for recessed fixtures.
 
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Old 05-21-07, 07:33 AM
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Everybody makes mistakes when learning, but be sure you know exactly where a cable comes from and what its purpose is before tapping into it. The mistake you made suggests that you should study up some more before doing more electrical work.

In addition to the requirement for an enclosed bulb, there are also clearance requirements. For recessed fixtures, the clearance requirements are not too strict. You only need 6 inches of horizontal clearance between the edge of the fixture and the nearest shelf (projected up to the ceiling), and at least 18 inches from a back or side wall.

10 cans on a 15-amp breaker is okay. But be sure to check to see what else is on this circuit. It is unlikely that the kitchen cans were the only thing on this circuit previously.
 
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Old 05-21-07, 08:39 AM
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Thank you both for the input. After reading another post on this site, as I mentioned in my first post, I need to get a cover for the bulb. The biggest mistake I guess would be the fact that the can is 6 inches and its in the center of a 24 inch deep closet. That doesn't give me 18 inches on either side.

So technically I cant even have that light in the closet. I guess I better look at patching up the hole and coming up with something else. My service panel is a little complicated, it has 4 15 amp breakers for general lighting and receptacles. seems to turn the lights and receptacles off in the main part if the house. Then each room has its own setup marked. master, den, bed 1 bed 2. I have so much blown in insulation up in the ceiling its hard to find anything.

I guess first things first. I need to look at getting a new light all together.

Thanks again for the replies

Gregg
 
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Old 05-21-07, 11:49 AM
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Read my post again. It must be 18 inches from the side and back walls, but need not be 18 inches from the front wall. Mount it front and center. That'll be better to see with anyway. Where you have it will cast bad shadows.
 
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Old 05-21-07, 11:57 AM
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First things first.

Determine exactly what is on each and every circuit breaker in your house. Know without any hesitation which circuit breaker controls each and every light, receptacle and appliance in your house. You want to be able to very quickly and without fumbling shut off power to something without shutting off poer to the entire house.

This information is invaluable when something goes wrong and in the right situation could save your life.

Then you can worry about figuring out where to grab power from for your light.
 
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Old 05-21-07, 09:05 PM
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Originally Posted by John Nelson View Post
Read my post again. It must be 18 inches from the side and back walls, but need not be 18 inches from the front wall. Mount it front and center. That'll be better to see with anyway. Where you have it will cast bad shadows.
I have to move the light, I already see what you are saying about the shadows. I thought the light had to be centered in the closet. It looks good like that, but there isnt but 12 inches from center to the back wall. I may even go with a different fixture all together. I have to get a cleat and a piece of drywall and redo the ceiling. I think the hardest part about everything is my texture. My whole house is skip trowel.
 
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Old 05-21-07, 09:13 PM
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And to Rac. I will find out what all of the breakers go to this weekend. Looking at the service panel, my wiring is pretty well thought out. Everything is setup by rooms with the exception of the "general lighting and receptacles" Everything else is labeled, "Double Oven" "Cooktop" "Microwave" Washer" "Dryer" "Master Bedroom"

Now when I do get power from somewhere to run my can into the closet, can I pull the power from an outlet. There is an outlet right outside of the closet, which in the ceiling would be maybe 2-3 feet from the can?
 
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Old 05-22-07, 04:05 AM
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Properly labeling circuits is something that many electricians installing panels fail to do. Sure, they get the major circuits (such as the ones you mention), but they rarely are detailed enough on the circuits that span several rooms, or worse when two circuits share a room. This is why it is important to verify whatever information is present, plus clear up any ambiguities.

Whether or not you grab power from this receptacle or not depends on what else is on the circuit. You most likely can. However, if it is a bathroom or dining room or kitchen then the answer would be no.
 
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Old 05-22-07, 07:43 AM
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Seems like there is alot more to learn before I want to do anymore electrical wiring in the house. I have been able to do all of the other self help projects in the house. I even bought a $30 wiring book from the local big box store. I read it cover to cover, and there are still plenty of things that I dont know about wiring.

I need to go back to the old drawing board so to speak. I will work on labeling everything this weekend. I have some spare time. I need to get my light straightened out first. The receptacle outside the closet would be in the dining room. So I cant use that either. I will keep everyone posted as I make changes thank everyone for your help.



Gregg
 
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