Will this setup work in my gazebo?

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Old 06-05-07, 09:06 PM
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Will this setup work in my gazebo?

Hi, I am wanting to put a ceiling fan in my gazebo. I have never done anything like this before. The problem is that the only power I have outside is a light outside the back door. I have a gazebo fan with the 3 wires coming out of it and I want to connect these 3 wires to an extension cord (tool-replacement-cord) that turns into a 3-prong plug. This is so I can just plug the cord into the light-socket to plug converter. Are there any inherent problems with this?

I know this is a lot of rigging going on here but we are probably only going to be living here for about 3-4 months (its a rental) and I don't want to throw a lot of money into this.

Thanks for any help
 
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Old 06-06-07, 04:18 AM
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Yes, there is something wrong with this idea. It is dangerous. Do not do it.
 
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Old 06-06-07, 06:20 AM
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Is it unsafe because it is in a gazebo, because of the cord I want to use, or because of wanting to hook it up to a light socket adapter? Are you saying the cord might short out on the gazebo frame or something?

It there any way to do this without throwing a lot of cash at it? I gotta get this to work somehow because it is too hot outside - i'm melting over here. Thanks for any help.
 
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Old 06-06-07, 06:47 AM
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Attaching a ceiling fan in a house in a gazebo or anywhere in a temporary setup is dangerous from both an electrical and a structural point of view.

Use a portable fan if you feel you need anything.
 
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Old 06-06-07, 07:13 AM
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A few years ago we lived in an apartment and the complex had put a ceiling fan up in the living room with a plug running to a normal socket, so I know it can be done.

If the problem is about connecting the fan to the top of the gazebo then I will get some strong bolts and a heavy duty bracket so I don't have to worry about it falling with the vibrations. You see, when we move I am going to take the gazebo and fan so I want it to be sturdy.

It is the electrical part that i am questionable about. What problems (if any) am I going to see if I hook up that cord to the light socket?.

P.S. This is doityourself.com isn't it? I am looking for any constructive feedback/advice, not simple dismissal.
 
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Old 06-06-07, 07:21 AM
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This is a do-it-yourself forum. However, what you want to do is NOT safe. I will not comment further. I have also edited your post to remove the personal insult.

From your description, what you had in a previous apartment was not safe either.

Modifying something that is intended to be hardwired is the wrong way to install an electrical device.

If they make a ceiling fan that intended to be plugged in, then by all means buy and use that ceiling fan. It will come with a cord and plug. Plug it into a proper receptacle.

My feedback is to not modify a fan that is intended for hardwired connection so that it an be plugged in.
 
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Old 06-06-07, 07:40 AM
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OK Racraft, thank you for your contributions.

Now, to anyone else who has experience in anything like this...

Has anyone ever ran cable like this and had it work or not work. I figure if I make sure the splice is done right and I keep the cable dry then I will be ok. How many items can I run thru one of those light-socket-to-plug adapters? I want to run the ceiling fan/light some other xmas lights and probably a radio. Are these too many items to run at once? I don't know how much juice will flow thru a light socket. Thanks again for any help.
 
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Old 06-06-07, 08:17 AM
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Doing this the safe way (with buried cable and permanent wiring) isn't really much harder than doing it the unsafe way. Unless you see this as an extremely temporary installation, please at least consider doing it right. Trust me, you'll be glad you did.
 
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Old 06-06-07, 08:25 AM
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Do NOT use a light socket adapter. Very rarely are outside lights GFCI protected. If you are going to rig up something as unsafe as this, at least insist on GFCI protection. You could kill yourself without it.

Here is what I would do for something like this. I would wire the gazebo properly, with permanent wiring. I would run this permanent wiring through a faceless GFCI or even through a regular GFCI, and then to a power inlet located near the ground level, but still part of the gazebo.

By power inlet I mean a socket where you can connect up the female end of an extension cord.

I would then use an extension cord of the proper size, plugged into a properly grounded receptacle. By proper size that would be probably at least a 14 gage extension cord.
 
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Old 06-06-07, 11:27 AM
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OK thanks for the good input, now we are getting somewhere. Now I have a few more questions.

I would like to set up the gazebo correctly but I don't know how. What exactly do I need to set up the gazebo for permanent wiring? Do I just go buy a few boxes from home depot and some outdoor wire?

As far as the "properly grounded receptacle" goes thats where I am running into problems... All I have outside is a light socket. Can I replace the light assembly with a socket box of some sort? (since we don't want to use that light anymore). Or do I need an electrician to come and put a socket box outside? If so, How much abouts is something like this going to run?

The owner gave me permission to make any (reasonable) changes I want to the house, but I don't want to throw a lot of money at an electrician for something i'm only going to benefit from for a few months, ya know.

Thanks again
 
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Old 06-06-07, 12:21 PM
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First, you need a home wiring book. Many of them tell you how to wire a receptacle in your garden, or a light on a post. What you need here will be similar.

Then you need some underground wire. I suggest direct burial cable, probably 14/2 UF-B. You'll need something to protect the cable when it's above ground. I can't see what you have to work with, but 3/4" PVC conduit will probably do. Just use it as a sleeve over the cable. You might want to buy some of those conduit clamps to mount it to your house and/or gazebo. There are also other ways you can provide the protection. The possibilities are nearly endless.

Then you'll need to find some place to get power from. Most homes have an outdoor receptacle, or a receptacle in the garage that you can tie into. Since a fan uses such little power, there is rarely a need to install a new circuit.

You want to provide GFCI protection for the cable. If the receptacle where you tie in is in the garage or outside, you'll already have that. Otherwise, you'll need a GFCI receptacle and a box to put it in.

You might want to rent a trencher, but you only need to bury the cable 12 inches deep. So if digging is not too hard and you don't have far to go, you can dig it by hand.

You'll of course need a fan-rated box to hang the fan from, and you'll need miscellaneous wire nuts. Make sure your fan is rated for outdoor locations.

It's a nice weekend project, and you'll be so proud of the job when you're done. Best of all, you and your family will be safe.

Get the book, and then come back with specific questions. Good luck.
 
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Old 06-06-07, 12:33 PM
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OK thanks for all that info John, this is starting to make sense.. The gazebo is outside in the back and right next to the house so I won't have to run any underground cable to get to it.
Here it the only problem I see... There is no outdoor receptacle at all. It's an old house and the only electricity in the back is the outdoor light socket. The light is practically touching the gazebo itself which is why we don't use that lightbulb. If I can't get a plug from that light then do I have to get someone to come in and run a cable from inside the house, drill a hole in the wall, hook up a box, etc.?
 
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Old 06-06-07, 01:49 PM
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If you were to drill a hole through the house next to the gazebo, what room would you be in? Does your house have frame walls, block walls, something else?

Do you have an attached garage? If so, how far is it from the gazebo?

No exterior receptacles at all, anywhere around your house?
 
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Old 06-06-07, 02:49 PM
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"" The owner gave me permission to make any (reasonable) changes I want to the house, but I don't want to throw a lot of money at an electrician for something i'm only going to benefit from for a few months, ya know. ""

Oh Oh is this is the rental place or what ??

If so that will raise red flag pretty fast here this is pretty serious matter you have to deal with it

I dont want this to haut ya on this one but really IMO please get a electrician to do this for safey sake.

But you can ask the Electrician to set up a outdoor repectaile with GFCI and have it pipe it to the gazabo it will work this way when you decied to move all you have to remove the piped part back to the outdoor repectale that way when the future tentents move in they will have a benfiet having a outdoor repectale ready there.

Merci , Marc
 
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Old 06-06-07, 03:06 PM
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Do not do any electrical work to the house. You are not an electrician, and any work you do may be illegal, even if you do it properly. Even with permission you will still be liable if you, perhaps criminally, if you cause a fire or kill or injure someone.
 
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Old 06-06-07, 03:17 PM
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OK i'll put the fan on hold for a week or so while I figure this out. I'll get some misters in the meantime.

Now, If I (or electrician) drill thru the wall where the gazebo is at then I am in the kitchen. There are plenty of sockets there. I guess it's as easy as running some wires from a box in the kitchen, thru the exterior wall, to a new box right outside the wall. From there I can connect it via extension cord "to a power inlet located near the ground level" on the gazebo. This would make it safe and we would then have an extra outside power outlet. You think an electrician will charge me an arm and a leg to do the outside box or what?

In the meantime I will just run the radio off of the outdoor-light-converted-into-an-outlet. Heres one more question, can I put a power strip and run some xmas lights on this in addition to the radio? Do these things work ok with multiple plugs?

Thanks for all the info so far!
 
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Old 06-06-07, 03:26 PM
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No, it is not that simple. The kitchen circuit cannot be extended to outside the house. Some other circuit, or a new circuit needs to be run.
 
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Old 06-06-07, 05:25 PM
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If you use one of those converters that converts a light socket to a receptacle, don't run more than 60 watts of stuff with it.
 
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Old 06-06-07, 08:31 PM
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OK thanks John, Ill run a radio and a small light or two and thats it. Once I get some of this stuff figured out I will start a new thread if necessary. Thanks for all the help.....
 
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Old 06-06-07, 09:50 PM
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God I love hard-heads...they screw it up and I get to charge double to fix it That was probably out of line, but I just love it when you try to tell someone how to do something right and they just off and ignore you...you people should be grateful there are sites like this, MOST DIY ELECTRICAL WORK IN THE US IS ILLEGAL, HO'S ARE NOT ALLOWED TO DO ELECTRICAL WORK BEYOND REPLACING DEVICES THAT ALREADY EXIST!
 
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Old 06-07-07, 03:42 AM
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Hbsparky, I, too, find myself having to charge to straighten up messes, but Homeowners are allowed to do whatever they want to their electrical systems, as long as they are able to pull a permit and have it inspected. Now, if the permit is not issued due to local regulations, that is another story. Doing it improperly and not having it inspected opens up the homeowner to liability, that they quite often are willing to chance, shamefully so.
 
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Old 06-09-07, 04:46 PM
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"Ratfood" it is "unsafe" but it can be done.
That is why they make "Swag kits" they still sell them in the local
home improvement stores and if they're selling it, and you think it is
fine, do what ever you want.

Just do not leave any wires exposed, please, don't get hurt.

I won't argue with you, just do whatever you feel is best.

I can't lie, i've done this before and probably still have fixtures inside/outside
the house that are plugged into a grounded outlet.

I just pay a little more attention to those items a little more.


Just think, 20 years ago, these were popular with ceiling fans and still are
in some older homes.

I'm not going to tell you what's right or wrong, it's your home & your business.
be careful!





Just be safe, don't get hurt, remember don't wire object when it is plugged
in the outlet, or else it won't be pretty.

Goodluck!


Have a good one!
 
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