Total Install Heat/Fan/Light Bathroom Fan

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  #1  
Old 10-18-07, 06:15 PM
M
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Total Install Heat/Fan/Light Bathroom Fan

I have no fan currently in my bathroom and i would like to install a Heat/Fan?Light exhaust in my bathroom. I figured everything out excpet how to run the electrical. I will using power from a light swtich and outlet already in there, it runs our mirror lights.

How do the run the wires for the new exhaust fan? I will be using a timer switch for the heat and normal switches for the fan light and fan. Do they sell wires with 3 wires inside and a ground?

I plan to piggy back off of the plug outlet(which is only used for a night light). Use that for the electrical power to the run the fan/heat/light. Then run wire from attic to the new outlets that i have to install.

Will this work?

Any advice would be great!

Matt
 
  #2  
Old 10-18-07, 07:34 PM
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Before you go any further, buy and read two or three books on home wiring. I recommend that you start with Wiring Simplified which is available in the big box stores or on-line. Before you can tackle a project like this, you need a basic understanding of electricity which you do not seem to have, at least not yet.

You also need to have a plan. A plan as to where you want to pull power from and how you want to run the wires. While you do have a plan, you have not convinced me (and probably yourself) that the plan is valid, safe or legal.

What else is on this circuit? A bathroom heater combination like you plan to use draws considerable current. Any old circuit will not be able to support it.

What else is on the circuit? In the US it may not be legal to use this circuit, depending on what else is on it.


How old is this circuit? if the house is older, in addition to the above issues, it may not be legal to extend this circuit.
 
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Old 10-18-07, 09:05 PM
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This is my plan basically. I didnt realize that the heat part of the fan would draw as much power. I have 2 electrical books at home and have done minor electrical projects.


Think i should install everything then have electrician come in and hook it all up for me? I dont want to burn the house down.
 
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Old 10-18-07, 09:19 PM
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More than likely your new unit will require a circuit just for its use.

Even if it does not you will have issues when using the heat and a blow dryer or curling iron. These 2 loads combined will overload the breaker.
 
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Old 10-19-07, 06:21 AM
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Well, I'll give you bonus points for a detailed drawing, but take off points because of the labeling.

In your drawing you have omitted the ground wires or you have omitted the neutral wires. I suspect when you wrote in "ground" for the wires drawn in black you are really referring to the neutral (or return) wires. The neutral wires are the white wires and they carry current back to the panel. The ground wires are the bare or green insulated wires. It's okay to omit the ground wires in a diagram like this, as long as they are present. If you have no ground wire then you cannot extend this circuit.

As for the drawing, you only want one neutral wire going to the ceiling heater/fan/light, not two. If the unit has separate neutral connections for some of the functions then you can have two neutrals. It is, however, important to keep the current flowing in each direction in a particular cable equal.

Again I will state that that you need to understand what is already on this circuit. Do not violate code to install this,. and most certainly do not install it in such a way that you are constantly tripping a breaker or blowing a fuse or having to worry about what else might be turned on when the heater is on.
 
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Old 10-19-07, 11:00 AM
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I suggest you forgo the unit with the heater. Or consider a unit with a radiating heat bulb, which typically uses a lot less power than simple resistence heating.

You said that you didn't realize that the heat would draw so much power. Now that you do realize it, it's time to revise the plan.

Things that produce heat, from space heaters to bathroom heaters to hair dryers, are the largest 120-volt electrical loads in your house. Each of these usually appliances consumes all the power on a circuit all by itself.
 
  #7  
Old 10-19-07, 12:33 PM
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Smile Heater?

I dont know what region you live in but I have a radiant heat bulb in my overhead light/exhaust fan in our bath and hardly ever use it. If we do, it provides plenty of heat.
 
 

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