Lighting a room from a soffit w/ recessed lighting

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  #1  
Old 01-08-08, 12:32 PM
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Lighting a room from a soffit w/ recessed lighting

I really like recessed lighting, but it is very harsh. I'm renovating a family room next to a kitchen and I had the idea of mounting recessed lights in the soffit to bounce off the ceiling, with the idea of having both a warmer light and not having anything hanging down too far down from the ceiling (removing an existing ceiling fan), as the floor will be raised 4".

I'm thinking of the 4" eyeball-type cans. The soffit is approximately 12" deep and runs the length of the room. We have young kids, so I'm concerned that other styles of lights might get broken. This is the room we use the most in the house.

I'm wondering if anyone has experience with this (good, bad or otherwise) or if anyone has other recommendations for lighting this space. The area is roughly 14x14.
 

Last edited by schaefms; 01-08-08 at 12:35 PM. Reason: Forgot to ask question...
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Old 01-08-08, 04:27 PM
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Your idea is OK, but your execution needs work. Lighting a room with indirect light is not new, and works well. Look in any office reception area. But doing it with recessed lights can be a problem. Limited throw of light from each fixture. Consider rope lights, warm white fluorescents, or lighting fixtures that throws a continuous layer of light, not spotty lights.
 
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Old 01-08-08, 05:14 PM
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And can lights upside down make for good bug catchers, pounds of them. Warm fluorescents are my choice.
 
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Old 01-08-08, 05:59 PM
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If you are thinking about recessed light mounted upside down you will get a hot spot of concentrated light above the fixture, but not much else.

I would look for some sort of strip lighting.
 
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Old 01-09-08, 05:21 AM
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More info

I was thinking of mounting them horizontally, aimed at the ceiling. There really isn't any way to mount them upside down. So the question is how much of a hot spot would there be near the lights and whether it would look too strange/uneven.
 
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Old 01-09-08, 07:48 AM
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I don't understand. I guess I don't see the picture.

Normally, can lights are aimed at the floor. So when you say that you want them "aimed at the ceiling", that does say "upside down" to me. And when you say "horizontally", the picture in my mind is a can light aimed at the wall.

Can lights are best when they are about 6 to 8 feet away from what they are aimed at so that the light has room to disperse. When people want reflected light off the ceiling, they normally use something like a sconce.

Can you clarify?
 
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Old 01-09-08, 08:29 AM
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Okay, I guess I must not have framed this properly. If I want to light a painting on a wall, I don't have to install a recessed light directly across the room from the painting. I merely have to install a special sort of recessed light in the ceiling that, instead of shining straight down can be aimed at the painting. There are such products here: http://www.junolightinggroup.com/pro...1&brand=1&hl=2

So, let me pose the question again, I would like to mount a row of "eyeball-type" recessed lights horizontally, but aimed at the ceiling to provide a consistent, but not harsh, level of light in a room. For simplicity, lets say I want to mount them in one of the four walls of a 14x14 room within 12" of the ceiling. Has anyone done this or something similar and how did it work?
 
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Old 01-10-08, 10:09 PM
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I guess this might work, as long as the can manufacturer states that the product can be mounted horizontally. I'd read the directions carefully. Horizontal mounting might (or might not) interfere with the correct operation of the thermal protection.

However, I still think wall sconces would look more attractive, and could still bounce the light off the ceiling.
 
  #9  
Old 01-11-08, 06:24 AM
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Okay, thanks for all of the advice!
 
 

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