Adding recessed lighting to bedroom circuit

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  #1  
Old 06-16-08, 10:30 PM
T
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Adding recessed lighting to bedroom circuit

Hey, Guys! I am planning to add some recessed lighting to my bedroom and I want to run the plan by y'all to make sure I don't blow anything up.

The bedroom light circuit goes to a 3 gang wall box with a switch for an outdoor floodlight, a switch for the fan light, and a switch for the fan. I want to add 4 lighting cans to the circuit. I will change the wallbox to a 4 gang box and add a dimmer switch for the cans. I have 14/2 romex to run to the first can, then from there to the second, and so on. There is good attic access above the room to make the work pretty easy.

Is adding on to the circuit like this OK? Any major problems or code violations I may encounter? Is the 14/2 romex adequate? I appreciate any insight.

Thanks!
 
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Old 06-17-08, 06:46 PM
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You really need to find out everything that is connected to the circuit you are considering adding the new load to. This circuit may also serve other rooms and/or receptacle loads. What is the maximum size bulb that the fixture and trim is rated for?

The 14-2 would be adequate if the circuit is 15 amp. You would need 12 gauge wire for a 20 amp circuit.

Some areas might consider this enough to require the installation of arc-fault breakers. Check with your building department.

Before you remove the old box mark and make note of all the connections to save you time and trouble later.

If you go through with this make sure you get IC rated housings. Some areas also require air-tight housings.
 
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Old 06-20-08, 03:36 PM
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Thanks for the reply, pcboss.

The circuit is a 15 amp circuit (the breaker is a half-size breaker - an "A" or "B" breaker, if you will. Don't know if that matters). It has the following loads on it: 2 closet lights (regular 65W bulbs), a fan light kit (2 65W standard bulbs), the fan, and 2 150W halogen floodlights outside. No outlets on the circuit.

I assume that the box that I would be adding to (controls the fan, fan light kit, and outside floods) is an end-of-run since there is only an incoming black/white/ground line and then the three outgoing black/white/grounds for the three switches.

I have 4 IC air-tight housings rated for 75W bulbs with the trims.

By my calculations, the circuit load with the 4 new lights would be about 9-10 amps, leaving plenty of space on the circuit.

Any flaw in my logic/calcs? Any other advice?

Thanks for the help.

-T
 
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Old 06-22-08, 06:13 PM
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It seems odd to have so little on that circuit. Are there receptacles on the same circuit?

It sounds like you may be ok with your proposed additional load.
 
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Old 06-22-08, 08:14 PM
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Thanks for the reply.

There are no receptacles on the circuit. There is a second master bedroom receptacle circuit on an arc fault breaker. The previous owner built the house himself (I mean he literally wired the house himself) and he wanted very organized wiring with plentiful circuits. I think he was an electrical engineer.

Just for the sake of argument, if the circuit was overloaded what would happen? Would the breaker just continually trip?

Thanks again.

-T
 
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Old 06-23-08, 08:30 AM
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Overloaded circuits do trip the breaker, which should prevent a fire. However, a breaker that trips frequently and is reset will eventually fail (usually fails in the "safe" direction). And a frequently overloaded or nearly overloaded circuit (even if it doesn't trip the breaker) often causes weak connections to fail, thus leaving you with a power outage somewhere. And heavily loaded wires dry out the insulation over long periods of time, thus causing it to become brittle and in severe cases fall off. This takes many years.
 
 

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