Recessed Light, Non-IC, Insulation Contact

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Old 03-14-09, 04:24 PM
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Recessed Light, Non-IC, Insulation Contact

I'm installing a 4" remodel recessed can in my kitchen, and there is insulation where I will be installing the light. The can is non-IC, but figured it would be ok as long as I cut a hole in the insulation and the can isn't in contact. Should this be ok?
 
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Old 03-14-09, 04:59 PM
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If you have an attic above your kitchen you should be using IC rated and air sealed or you will be venting warm moist air into your attic, not good.

Bud
 
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Old 03-14-09, 08:20 PM
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No attic above. The recessed lights (two of them) will be installed in a pop-out, which has a small "roof" above it. Pop out is about 6 feet wide and extends 2 feet off the back of the house. The small roof area over top is insulated. I was worried about fire hazards, but didn't even think of the moisture issue. Will this be a problem for my particular application? The lights are operated on a separate switch from the main kitchen lights, so they won't be on for long periods of time.
 
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Old 03-14-09, 08:39 PM
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IC cans only cost about a buck more than non-IC cans. Can't you just take the non-IC cans back and get IC cans? You'll very quickly make up the extra cost in lower heating and cooling bills.
 
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Old 03-14-09, 08:58 PM
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Problem is I don't think they (Home Depot) carry a 4" IC can for the type of trim I'm using. I've already installed 6 of these in the kitchen, and have two more to install in the pop-out. We're literally talking about a nine square foot space above the pop-out, which is isolated from any other space. Do you still think it's necessary to go with an IC can?
 
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Old 03-14-09, 09:33 PM
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If it's a non-IC can, then you need to keep all insulation at least 3 inches away from the can. As long as you can do this, you're good to go. Also pay attention to clearance requirements from any wood members, as non-IC cans need more clearance from wood than IC cans. The clearance requirements will be listed by the can manufacturer.

Whether or not moisture will be an issue depends on your climate. One risk is that the moisture will freeze to the underside of your roof. Then come spring, it will rain in your attic. Even if you don't live in a freezing climate, you may still get your insulation damp, possibly causing mold. How well ventilated is this space?
 
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Old 03-14-09, 09:57 PM
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Space is not ventilated. It is only a 9 sq ft. area above a 2 foot pop-out. What if I just removed the drywall and installed insulation against the top of the roof? That way I would block any cold air from entering the space, thus eliminating any temperature differential.
 
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Old 03-15-09, 07:21 AM
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If you are going to remove drywall you might as well install the IC rated housing and save yourself the money by not having the conditioned air leak into that space. You will pay for the energy losses until you sell the house if you don't.
 
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Old 03-15-09, 08:38 AM
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The area wasn't properly insulated to begin with. I already cut the holes for the lights and cold air is pouring out. Therefore, I will be removing a 4 foot x 2 foot section of drywall and properly insulating the area. My main question is if it is ok to install insulation directly against the roof? Again, this isn't the attic, its a 9 cubic foot area/roof above a pop-out (6ft wide, 2 ft deep, 1.5 ft tall roof area). Perhaps "roof" is the wrong word to use, but I can't think of another appropriate term for this space. To put it in perspective, the area that needs insulating is about the size of a coffin.
 
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Old 03-16-09, 09:16 AM
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Yes, you should be able to install insulation directly against the roof. And then cover it with a vapor barrier. That essentially turns this space from unconditioned space into conditioned space. You may want to consult some attic experts for more hints. Try the "Insulation, Radiant and Vapor Barriers" forum:

Insulation, Radiant and Vapor Barriers - DoItYourself.com Community Forums

... but I see that you've already been over there.
 
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Old 03-17-09, 10:31 AM
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No one has answered my questions in the insulation forum. I think I know enough now from doing my own research that I should just go ahead an install some IC-rated cans and fill that area with blown insulation. That would be the easiest, most straightforward solution. I'm hoping to find a 4" IC can or housing for my application since I already have the lights. I saw a 3" IC housing at Lowe's yesterday so I'm hoping a 4" exists. It's essentially an empty, sealed box that sits in the ceiling and you mount your non-IC can inside of it. Anyone used one of these before?
 
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Old 03-17-09, 11:28 AM
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Whenever I have needed an air-tight IC fixture I always bought a fixture that was designed that way.
 
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Old 03-17-09, 04:00 PM
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Problem is, no one seems to offer a 4" IC-rated remodel can. May just bite the bullet and tear the drywall out. Not a big deal (6 ft x 2 ft section)
 
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Old 03-25-09, 11:03 AM
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Those lights are sweet! I saw some of them in an office building yesterday and wondered if they were IC. I plan on ordering three of these. Wish I didn't already cut those 4" holes in the ceiling. I really like the 3" ones. Now I just need to figure out where to buy them. The website is acting up.
 
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Old 01-31-10, 07:25 PM
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Thumbs up Lithonia Lighting L3R IC 4"

This housing is available at HomeDepot for $15. IC rated for lamps up to 35 watts. Fits 4" trims.
Lithonia Lighting - The best value in lighting 4U2
 
 

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