recces lighting and bathroom fan?

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Old 03-25-09, 06:17 PM
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Question recces lighting and bathroom fan?

Hi all, my husband and I recently bought our first house and our ding bat builder failed to put a bathroom fan any where in the bathroom except the separate toilet area. The people who lived here before us decided to paint the bathroom, but since there was no fan to do anything with the heat and steam, it ruined their paint job creating streaks running down all of the walls. (we have a decent size bathroom, so turning the fan on in the "toilet area" really does not help out.
Anyways, we are currently re-painting the bathroom and want to put a bathroom fan in, so we don't ruin our paint job lol.
The only problem is we only have recces lighting above the shower and another one over the separate jet tub. So what we want to do is replace the recces light in the shower with a bathroom fan, but I want to do this without having to cut into the ceiling and do all this extra work....is there any way to convert recces lighting into a bathroom fan, or any way of installing a fan where the recces lighting currently is without having to cut into the ceiling and what not.

Thank you in advance for any ideas and opinions!
 
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Old 03-25-09, 06:32 PM
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I do not see why its a big deal, you pull your light above shower out now you have a holl you just have to expand a holl a little bit bigger. Do you have access above your bathroom so that you can run vent hose for your fan to outside?
 
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Old 03-25-09, 06:50 PM
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Welcome to the forums! Do you have access to the area above the shower? If so, you can install a nice decorative fan light combination and not have to worry about it looking generic. You will have to run a vent, so that access to the area above the bathroom is necessary. I installed this one for a customer and it is actually a fan and a light, although it doesn't look like it. <a href="http://s76.photobucket.com/albums/j3/larrychandler/?action=view&current=DSCF0489.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="https://i76.photobucket.com/albums/j3/larrychandler/DSCF0489.jpg" width="640" height="480" border="0" alt="Photobucket"></a>
 
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Old 03-25-09, 07:41 PM
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Now I see what y'all are saying, and I do like that decorative light/fan.
I guess what we were wondering was if there was any sort of converter or anything like that, where we would just be able to switch them out haha. We wanted to avoid cutting into the ceiling and roof if at all possible. (looking less and less likely though lol)
We are a young couple (22) and just kinda learning the ins and outs of all this.
Thank you again.....if anyone else has anything keep it coming lol

 
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Old 03-25-09, 07:46 PM
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Originally Posted by CAKT08 View Post
Now I see what y'all are saying, and I do like that decorative light/fan.
I guess what we were wondering was if there was any sort of converter or anything like that, where we would just be able to switch them out haha. We wanted to avoid cutting into the ceiling and roof if at all possible. (looking less and less likely though lol)
We are a young couple (22) and just kinda learning the ins and outs of all this.
Thank you again.....if anyone else has anything keep it coming lol

ceiling you going to have to cut and with rite saw not a big deal, but you do not have to cut into your roof just run your fan hose close to your regular roof vent and tie it up there.
 
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Old 03-25-09, 07:49 PM
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If you are thinking of venting into your attic area you are looking for other problems. Moisture for example, with moisture comes mold with mold comes big money.
 
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Old 03-25-09, 08:04 PM
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Current codes call for the fan exhaust to be vented to the exterior of the structure. The vent tube just near the attic vent is not enough.

Also every exhaust fan instructions I have seen require GFI protection when mounted over a shower or tub. If they are outside the footprint they do not require the GFI protection.
 
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Old 03-25-09, 08:11 PM
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Originally Posted by pcboss View Post
Current codes call for the fan exhaust to be vented to the exterior of the structure. The vent tube just near the attic vent is not enough.

Also every exhaust fan instructions I have seen require GFI protection when mounted over a shower or tub. If they are outside the footprint they do not require the GFI protection.
I agree with everything you are saying, but hose tied next to mushroom vent is much better than into open attic area. Again that does not make it rite but if they are going to do it anyway at least do that.
 
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Old 03-25-09, 09:14 PM
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The advice given on this board tries to be correct and in a code compliant manner, not just this is close enough or this option is better but still not right.
 
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Old 03-25-09, 10:41 PM
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one common way is you can do run the exhaust hose from exhaust fan/light unit is go to the soffet area and if you can able reach it in the attic then it should not be a major issue all it depending on which way the trusses or rafter run and yes there is soffet kit you can use for bathroom exhaust fan most kit useally have in 4 inch size however some do have 3 inch size { this useally found with smaller or cheapie fans yeah they are the loudest as well }

Merci,Marc
 
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Old 03-26-09, 06:03 AM
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Cact08, if you want to tackle this, don't worry, we can walk you through it. There's someone here checking on the progress almost all the time. Don't be afraid to tackle it. The light fan I installed had a regular square fan box installed against a ceiling joist, and a 4" air take off for venting. Once you take out the can light, you can just cut the sheetrock to the size of the box, making sure you have a joist or other blocking to attach it to, attach it, wire it, set your exhaust and install the light/cover kit. One thought, although not bad, is the fan and light, unless you wire it differently, will come on at the same time. Not bad in the fact that you need the ventilation whenever you are in the shower anyway.
 
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Old 03-26-09, 07:43 AM
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Originally Posted by pcboss View Post
The advice given on this board tries to be correct and in a code compliant manner, not just this is close enough or this option is better but still not right.

Yup.... why you don't want to vent bathroom an attic:



I have seen many such examples of sheathing damage and mold growth in attics as a result of such "venting".

Best practice if you are in a cold climate is to vent through through solid metal wall metal pipe. insulated to help control condensation:



- Venting Exhaust Fans Through The Roof

Some installers recommend the use of spray foam insulation instead.

If you're using flexible pipe up make certain that there no compressed bends, or dips were water condensing out of the bath exhaust can accumulate, and with either type of vent pipe that no other bathroom or other exhaust fans are venting through the same cap:



Typical consumer grade bathroom fans can have difficulty achieving their rated exhaust through longer,convoluted ductwork, one option is to install a in-line fan, some of of these are intended to serve several bathrooms, they can share bathroom exhaust lines because they are pulling, rather than pushing,exhaust air toward the vent cap, and are installed after the last junction of vent pipes from the bathroom.
 
 

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