I want a large fluorescent light in garage

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Old 09-17-10, 01:00 AM
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I want a large fluorescent light in garage

I have a regular light socket that doesn't give off a lot of light when its dark outside. I am looking to install a large fluorescent light instead of that regular light bulb that is there now. I saw one while walking my dog and swear it was like 2 feet long. That would be something that I would be interested in.

How do I get started? Thanks for any advice
 
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Old 09-17-10, 02:59 AM
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Often time it would be as simple as removing the old fixture and installing the new one.

If this flourescent fixture is going to mount over the existing box you must allow access to the box. Puliing the wires into the fixture thru a 1/2" knockout does not cut it. There might already be a 3-4" knockout for this purpose.
 
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Old 09-17-10, 04:45 AM
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A double 4' fluorescent fixture (shop light) will give you plenty of light in the garage.
Jim, if the original light covered the jbox, why couldn't the new fluorescent light cover the box with wiring entering the fixture via a hole meant for the wiring? Curious.
 
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Old 09-17-10, 10:02 AM
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If you want something that will just screw into your existing light socket there are some quite large and powerful compact fluorescents available now. The bulbs can be a bit expensive, but it's easy.

Replacing the fixture with a standard 8' long fluorescent will give you more light and because the light is coming from the long bulb dark shadows will be minimized which makes working much easier. If you really want some light I'd go for high output (HO) or very high output (VHO) fluorescent lights. The VHO's may be overkill but I find the HO fixtures to be perfect. They put out enough light so you can easily work on fine parts but are not so bright that they blind you if you happen to look up.
 
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Old 09-17-10, 11:03 AM
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Or replace the lamp holder with a duplex receptacle and hang a couple of two tube four foot shop lights (fluorescent). They can be bought pre-wired with cord and plug so all you have to do is plug them in. This will allow you to place two sets of lights several feet apart and give better light distribution.
 
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Old 09-18-10, 01:40 PM
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Originally Posted by chandler View Post
A double 4' fluorescent fixture (shop light) will give you plenty of light in the garage.
Jim, if the original light covered the jbox, why couldn't the new fluorescent light cover the box with wiring entering the fixture via a hole meant for the wiring? Curious.
Here is a graphic from Mike Holts forum.

 
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Old 09-18-10, 04:07 PM
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Jim, thanks for the clarification. So now we have to cut large holes in the backs of fluorescent fixtures to match the junction box? What if all the wiring is brought in the fixture from the jb? Doesn't the fixture itself then become the new junction box and is accessible and meet the wording?
Wow, this is getting complicated. Appreciate your input!!
 
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Old 09-18-10, 04:36 PM
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As the graphic shows the whole box needs to be accessible. You just cannot bring the leads into the fixture thru a 1/2" KO and make up the splice to the fixture leads.

The fixture compartment would add space to the JB.
 
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Old 09-18-10, 07:50 PM
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I think the cheapest and simplest way to go is as Ray suggested. Just swap out the current incandesent fixture with an outlet.

In my area the outlet would have to be simplex or GFI served if you only have one light plugged in. I'm not sure what the NEC calls for in a garage but I know the local inspector won't buy a duplex outlet in the overhead unless it serves two lights.
 
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Old 09-19-10, 07:32 AM
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Under the 2008 NEC all 120 volt receptacles require GFI protection, including any ceiling mounted receptacles. The exception for appliance receptacles in dedicated spaces like for freezers is gone also.
 
 

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