110 over 220's efficency

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Old 11-30-10, 09:40 AM
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110 over 220's efficency

updating the workshop where i have metal halide lights. they are currently wired for 110 and i have the option of changing them over to 220 whilst i've got everything else exposed. is there any benefit to 220? i heard somewhere that they are more efficient by 10% when wired this way, any truth? i realize that setting up with t-8 lighting will be a lot more efficient so i might just leave it 110 so once i'm able to make the investment i can switch over but i would at least like to satisfy this question once and for all.

p.s. they are mostly 1000w and a few 400w if it makes a difference.
 
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Old 11-30-10, 09:48 AM
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Not sure of the actual efficiency. Normally 240 just allows you to use smaller wire and breakers due to the amp loading. Don't know if those lamps are the same...but a normal 1000W load at 120 draws 8.3 amps...and only 4.15 at 220.
 

Last edited by Gunguy45; 11-30-10 at 11:12 AM. Reason: corrected voltage...duh
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Old 11-30-10, 10:45 AM
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The electric used is measured in watts. Regardless of voltage the same number of watts are used so operating costs are the same. Installation costs though may be slightly less for a 240v fixture. Preceding applies to single phase.

Tech note: in the US it is 120v and 240v nominal voltage 5% on single phase services.
 
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Old 11-30-10, 12:18 PM
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The others are correct. A watt is a watt is a watt. It doesn't matter if it is 12 volts or 480 volts the power used is the same. The main difference is during the install because as voltage goes up, current (amps) go down. This allows you to run more things on the same circuit or use smaller wire/over current devices. (breakers or fuses)
 
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Old 11-30-10, 01:01 PM
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The only advantage I have found in a shop set up is changing the saws, etc. to 24o volts. It helps with spool up speed and less bogging. Consumption is the same, smaller wire is a plus.
 
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Old 11-30-10, 02:17 PM
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thanks a lot y'all

chandler, good point about the saws bogging down. i actually forgot to include that in the post but yeah, major plus.
ray, sorry about the 110/120 220/240 business. that's how my pappie said it so that's how i says it. i may one day break myself of the habit.
i haven't yet decided but i think i have all the information i need. thanks again!
 
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Old 11-30-10, 02:44 PM
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Gunguy45 . . .

Just to clarify....LNG is not the same as propane. I really doubt anyone would have a LNG tank in their yard...lol.
Vic, you got me this morning when I typed in LNG vs. LPG.

. . . but a normal 1000W load at 120 draws 8.3 amps...and only 4.15 at 220. . . . Last edited by Gunguy45; Today at 12:12 PM. Reason: corrected voltage...duh
110/220 or 120/240 . . . one back to ya! . . . lol.
 
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Old 11-30-10, 02:54 PM
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Hey...blame it on the OP...lol. Besides...I think that was BC (before coffee).
 
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Old 11-30-10, 03:05 PM
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ray, sorry about the 110/120 220/240 business. that's how my pappie said it so that's how i says it. i may one day break myself of the habit.
Don't be sorry. I think my correcting is programmed into me by my Pappie. He was a concrete inspector during WWII and he was in the habit of correcting anyone who said cement when they meant concrete. Grew up correcting tech terms. Just can't help myself but blame my Pappie. He programmed me with the concrete/cement thing.
 
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Old 11-30-10, 05:08 PM
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Originally Posted by chandler View Post
The only advantage I have found in a shop set up is changing the saws, etc. to 24o volts. It helps with spool up speed and less bogging. Consumption is the same, smaller wire is a plus.
I believe this has to do with voltage drop more then efficiency. At 240v your voltage drop, by percentage, is cut in half as well.

And since we're being picky: Electricity is not consumed. The power company is just moving electrons around.

This also reminds I REALLY need to rewire my saw.
 
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