Romex wiring gague

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Old 12-05-10, 10:04 AM
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Romex wiring gague

Can I connect 12/2 to existing 14/2 in a run for additional recessed lighting fixtures?
 
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Old 12-05-10, 10:32 AM
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Nope. You can't mix wire gauge in a circuit.
 
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Old 12-05-10, 11:08 AM
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Originally Posted by Wayne Mitchell View Post
Nope. You can't mix wire gauge in a circuit.
You may use larger wire to an existing circuit but this is frowned upon as it just causes confusion later.
 
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Old 12-05-10, 11:41 AM
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Thanks! I was just wondering because I have aleft over box of 12/2 and wanted to make sure adding 2 lights to the existing 14/2 circut wasn't against code.
 
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Old 12-05-10, 01:48 PM
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Advice given so far is right on. You can't mix the wiring, large to small. This, of course, brings up a parody. Using a 20 amp circuit and 12 gauge wire to a light fixture, and inside the fixture you connect your 12 gauge wire to a 16 gauge stranded wire. Just goes against the grain.
 
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Old 12-05-10, 07:05 PM
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Originally Posted by chandler View Post
Using a 20 amp circuit and 12 gauge wire to a light fixture, and inside the fixture you connect your 12 gauge wire to a 16 gauge stranded wire.
The difference is the fixture wire is, many times, a higher temp rating then the THHN/NM-b wire. Also, it only needs to carry the current for the light itself and not the current of the entire circuit. This is covered in Art. 402 (2005)
 
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