How to open outside light fixture

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Old 11-04-11, 10:25 PM
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How to open outside light fixture


It's an outdoor wall-mounted hanging lantern with no apparent way to open it up to replace the bulbs. The top finial is merely decorative. The frosted glass top doesn't appear to be removable nor do any of the glass panels seem to open. And the bottom doesn't seem to drop out. Everyone I've asked can't figure this one out. Any advice would be appreciated,
 
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Old 11-05-11, 07:02 AM
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Welcome to the forums! Different manufacturers, different tricks. They have a nerd at a console thinking of ways to confound the consumer, I think! In looking at your fixture, it appears the bottom finial, rosette and flare base would come off, but getting your hands up in the fixture may be a trick in itself.
In reality, your fixture needs to come down completely and reinstalled properly. The backer plate for the siding is missing a piece and is protruding past the siding allowing water to eek back behind it. You will most likely have to buy a new base, fasten it to the OSB, snap on the rain cover, THEN reinstall the light. While you have it down would be a good time to find out how to disassemble it for light bulb change. Bench work is always easier than on the wall.
 
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Old 11-05-11, 08:23 AM
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Light Fixture

I agree with Larry that the fixture should be removed and re-installed correctly.

I have had similar fixtures in the past which opened by removing the glass panels on the side. The panels were simply held in place by gravity. In your case, I would try sliding the outside panel upward to see if it would release from the "track" and could then be removed. Just a suggestion to try.

It looks to me like the fixture is held together with a rod going down through the enter of the fixture.

Good luck with your project.
 
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Old 11-05-11, 03:32 PM
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Thanks for the responses, but still no luck. Even if I could get bottom parts off, I'm sure my hands wouldn't fit inside to reach the bulbs. As for the other suggestion, the glass panels have two brackets at the top inside screwed to the frame and two rubber lips at the bottom. I tried gently pushing a panel up, but it didn't seem to move much. Maybe I'll have to bring in a professional.
 
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Old 11-05-11, 03:52 PM
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Opening Fixture

Unscrewing the center piece on the bottom should let the bottom including the bulb sockets drop down. Watch out for wires. The wires will be routed to the bottom section to power the bulb sockets.
 
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Old 11-06-11, 01:13 PM
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When I turn the center piece on the bottom, it just turns around but doesn't unscrew. If I turn the pointed piece below the round rim, the four bulb sockets turn inside the fixture. I don't think the bottom opens. Logically, it seems like the glass roof should open but there doesn't seem to be any "give" to allow it to move. Also, the top of the fixture is where the weight is supported so there doesn't seem to be anything to loosen to release the glass top. I again tried to move the glass sides, but no luck. Thanks for your help but I'm still looking for a solution. I can't believe the designer would make it so hard to replace a bulb.
 
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Old 11-06-11, 03:58 PM
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Fixture

Try turning the center piece on the bottom while holding the center piece on top. I believe one of the center pieces is threaded onto the center rod which goes down through the center of the fixture.
 
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Old 08-13-12, 07:45 AM
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Opening Fixture

You were right. The entire lantern portion of the fixture was disengaged by turning the bottom and holding the top. Once the lantern became loose, the nut holding the glass roof to the lantern had to be undone and then access to the bulbs was accomplished by turning the roof a 1/8 turn. This is a two-person job as the relatively heavy fixture, which now hangs only by the electrical wire, must be held from underneath by one person as the other changes the bulbs. For the second identical fixture I felt it was easier to remove the entire thing from the wall and work on it on a bench (as another poster had suggested). Bottom line: the lights are again bright, but I am baffled why the designer made it so hard to replace the bulbs.
 
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Old 08-13-12, 12:58 PM
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Think....1966 Chevy Nova with a V8. Number 8 plug was inaccessible unless the engine was lifted 6". Engineers don't have future thought processes. Only...will it fit, will it be safe, and will I have to change the bulbs/spark plugs for the consumer.
 
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Old 08-13-12, 01:28 PM
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Ever try to tune up an early 'vette? or an older Jag? The 1966 Chevy Nova with a V8 only had one inaccessible spark plug.

I have long held a pet theory that automotive engineers are on the take from the companies that sell you "the special tool you need to do that job."
 
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Old 08-13-12, 01:58 PM
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Engineers don't have future thought processes.
Only those "engineers" that went directly from high school to college. REAL engineers worked in the field BEFORE starting to design things. Everything I designed was also made to be serviced.
 
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Old 08-14-12, 07:17 PM
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Originally Posted by Nashkat1 View Post
Ever try to tune up an early 'vette? or an older Jag? The 1966 Chevy Nova with a V8 only had one inaccessible spark plug.

I have long held a pet theory that automotive engineers are on the take from the companies that sell you "the special tool you need to do that job."
I did the timing chains on my truck once.. The book said that I needed "Chrysler Special Tool #7639" (I dont remember the exact number) in order to lock the ratcheting tensioners in place during the replacement... Ok, so I looked up "Special Tool # 7639", and it costs $30.. And guess what it is? It's a straight piece of wire with a loop on it.. Looks suspiciously similar to a $30 fire extinguisher pin..



I used a straightened paper clip...
 
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Old 08-14-12, 09:55 PM
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OK, so i looked up "special tool # 7639", and it costs $30.. And guess what it is? It's a straight piece of wire with a loop on it.. Looks suspiciously similar to a $30 fire extinguisher pin..

I used a straightened paper clip...
ROFLMAo! .
 
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