Wiring Question: Changing range hood to microwave hood


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Old 12-01-11, 09:12 AM
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Wiring Question: Changing range hood to microwave hood

I have a Broan range hood over my stove that I'd like to replace with a microwave/hood.

The current range hood is hardwired into a circuit that is shared with the lighting and outlets in my living room. The living room is on the other side of my kitchen.

The current range hood circuit is not shared with anything in the kitchen.

Can I uninstall the range hood, convert the wiring coming out of the wall to a junction box/receptacle, and plug the microwave/hood into that?

The microwave install manual says: Product rating is 120 volts AC, 60 Hertz, 14 amps and 1.60 kilowatts.

The install manual says nothing about requiring a dedicated circuit.

Thanks everyone!
 
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Old 12-01-11, 09:20 AM
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The install manual says nothing about requiring a dedicated circuit.
But the NEC says any fixed in place appliance that exceeds 60% of total circuit capacity must not share with any other fixture or device.

The current range hood circuit is not shared with anything in the kitchen.

Can I uninstall the range hood, convert the wiring coming out of the wall to a junction box/receptacle, and plug the microwave/hood into that?... The microwave install manual says: Product rating is 120 volts AC, 60 Hertz, 14 amps
Yes, so long as it is a 20 amp circuit. However many exhaust hoods in the past were on 15 amp circuits with #14 wire. Be sure what you have before making plans to use it.
 
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Old 12-01-11, 09:25 AM
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Unfortunately it isn't. Looks like I'll have to have someone out to convert that circuit from 15 amp to 20.

I'm afraid my breaker is full, so adding a dedicated circuit for this appliance may not be possible either.
 
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Old 12-01-11, 09:48 AM
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There are ways to do it. Depending on your panel of course. They make twin (?) 1/2 height breakers that can give you 2 circuits where there was only one before.
 
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Old 12-02-11, 09:03 AM
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Originally Posted by sickest16 View Post
Unfortunately it isn't. Looks like I'll have to have someone out to convert that circuit from 15 amp to 20.

I'm afraid my breaker is full, so adding a dedicated circuit for this appliance may not be possible either.
The circuit will not be converted unless the wiring is already sized for a larger breaker which is highly unlikely. A new circuit will need to be installed.
 
 

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