Pressure on/off switch?

Reply

  #1  
Old 12-17-11, 09:30 PM
I
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: United States
Posts: 2
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Pressure on/off switch?

I've been building a few iron pipe lamps lately and have had a lot of fun. I've noticed various craftsmen and etsy sellers using gate valves and other mechanical devices to use as on/off switches. Here's an example:

Wall lamp Beer bottle Plumbing pipe & fittings by ZALcreations

Any ideas on how they're accomplishing this?

Thanks!
Jake
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 12-18-11, 08:27 AM
Tolyn Ironhand's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Twin Cities, MN
Posts: 13,633
Received 209 Votes on 185 Posts
I can only guess how they accomplish it. Could be a rotary switch, could be flipping a small toggle switch.

I do, however, have great concerns on selling them to the public. While they are assembled using UL components, they are not approved by UL. (plumbing parts are not listed for use as electrical parts. And last I checked, bottles are not UL listed at all) There are huge liability issues here. How are they attaching them to the wall? The plumbing flange will not connect to a electrical box so where are they making their splices? Splices can only be made in an approved box/fixture. This light would be much better/safer if it was low voltage or with a cord and an in line switch, but would still need to be UL listed to be sold to the public.
 
  #3  
Old 12-18-11, 10:04 AM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 33,597
Received 13 Votes on 11 Posts
And look at the price considering the amount of materials involved. Of course if I was rich I'd love to buy one just to take it apart.
 
  #4  
Old 12-19-11, 12:52 PM
I
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: United States
Posts: 2
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks for the feedback, all.

So that's not my shop, so I largely don't care much about what they're listing things as. I'm just curious how to construct a pressure switch myself

Any ideas where I might be able to start tracking down answers to crack this particular nut? Would a supply house of some sort have a bunch of switches I could review/test?

Thanks!
 
  #5  
Old 12-19-11, 02:12 PM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 33,597
Received 13 Votes on 11 Posts
I'd guess a NC momentary contact switch at the back of the valve. When you turn the valve stem in it depresses the switch opening the circuit. At the very least the seat of the valve would have to be drilled out to give access for seating the switch at the back of the valve. The valve stem would need a spring on the end to actually depress the switch other wise it would be too easy to crush the switch with the end of the valve stem.

The key problem would be finding a switch that would fit.

If you could modify the valve by drilling the stem threads out so the stem spun free without moving up and down you might be able to use a rotary switch.
 
  #6  
Old 12-19-11, 02:13 PM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,967
Received 6 Votes on 6 Posts
What the others have said. If you are using a gate valve, it may be possible to mount a single pole momentary normally open push button switch in the valve somehow (safely). The movement of the gate valve would press on the switch turning the light on. Releasing the pressure would allow it to go off again. Radio Shack has 'em.
 
  #7  
Old 12-19-11, 02:13 PM
G
Member
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Hamilton County, Ohio
Posts: 4,296
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
The way I read the ad, it says it has a rotary switch. I would think that a miniature rotary switch, with leads attached, could be used. The "valve" would be modified to simply spin, rather than screw out. Otherwise a miniature micro switch could be wired to open when to valve is closed and close when the valve is opened.
 
  #8  
Old 12-19-11, 02:22 PM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 33,597
Received 13 Votes on 11 Posts
If you could find room for an induction switch (touch switch) the valve could be a dummy. Just touching the metal anywhere would cause it to go of or on. Some induction switches even have multiple light levels.
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: