Replacing recessed light


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Old 04-24-13, 06:05 PM
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Replacing recessed light

I have an old house was recessed lights which were installed before I bought it. One of the fixtures blinks whenever I put a light bulb in it (no matter the wattage). I'd like to either replace the Thermocouple or ideally replace the whole thing with an LED fixture.

But I can't seem to figure out how to pull the canister out of the ceiling. All the videos online don't look similar to this recessed light, so they haven't been much help. I have pulled out the canister a bit (couple centimeters) and cannot seem to find any hooks/latches. I've included a picture, hope it helps.

Thanks!

[ATTACH=CONFIG]11887[/ATTACH]
[ATTACH=CONFIG]11888[/ATTACH]
 
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Old 04-24-13, 06:33 PM
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Welcome to the forums.

Sometimes trims get stuck but if you pull down on the outer ring you should get it to drop down enough to see the springs holding it in place.
 
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Old 04-24-13, 06:39 PM
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Welcome to the forums!!

Although I can't tell 100% by the picture, the trim appears to be one that is just held up with spring fingers. You should be able to just pull down on the trim and it should come down. You may have to twist the trim some for it to come down.

The big thing that is throwing me off is the metal tabs near the socket. That might be a retaining clip of some sort and you might have to move them to the center of the can to disconnect the trim from the socket part. I have not seen this exact type of can/trim before.

You should not need to remove the entire can housing, just the trim. You can then install an LED retrofit kit and be back in business in a matter of minutes.
 

Last edited by pcboss; 04-25-13 at 07:20 AM.
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Old 04-24-13, 06:45 PM
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Some of the cans .... like the 5" ones have the socket that snaps on to the trim.
 
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Old 04-25-13, 06:11 AM
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Thanks, I'll give it a try. I didn't want to start pulling down (harder) without knowing what I could possibly be doing.
 
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Old 04-25-13, 06:17 AM
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Thanks, I'll try to twist and pull today. The metal tabs near the socket are holding the socket in the trim from what I can tell. I've already pushed the tabs toward the center and the socket pops up into the ceiling.

Another question (to all), if I am having problems with the current light blinking (which I assume is the termocouple over-heating). Will I have to replace the thermocouple before putting in the LED retrofit or will the retrofit come with a new thermocouple?
 
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Old 04-25-13, 07:21 AM
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The thermal is built into the fixture.
 
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Old 04-25-13, 07:33 AM
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Since you no longer have the high heat from incandescent lamps..... the existing thermal switch should be ok.
 
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Old 04-25-13, 03:47 PM
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Looks like these recessed lights are a bit of a hack-job, there is no canister behind the trim. Not sure what the best approach is....

[ATTACH=CONFIG]11917[/ATTACH]
[ATTACH=CONFIG]11918[/ATTACH]
 
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Old 04-25-13, 05:41 PM
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Kind of an old type of can. I think I would replace them with an old work can.

You would need to see if you can get the old frame out of the way and get access to the junction box. I don't think those old style lights had thermal sensors either.

The can would say on it if it was a thermally protected fixture.

Maybe you find what the issue is with the fixture and just relamp it with an LED type flood lamp.
 
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Old 04-25-13, 06:02 PM
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I can seen the junction box but I don't know if a standard LED retrofit will work without a standard can. The socket actually has a notice on it: Thermally Protected Fixture. Light blinking indicates improper lamp size or insulation too close to fixture.

[ATTACH=CONFIG]11920[/ATTACH]
 
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Old 04-25-13, 06:47 PM
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Another reason to dislike Lightolier. That design is similar to larger "architectural" cans I have installed just a few months ago. Those were in a commercial space, and were 8 cans"

PJmax's suggestion is likely the best one. However the thermal device will be near the socket. You could replace that, and then install some LED screw in light bulbs.
 
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Old 04-25-13, 07:07 PM
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The thermal was in the side of the junction box. Look for a black cylinder sticking out of the junction box.
 
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Old 04-26-13, 03:06 PM
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pcboss: I can't seem to find the thermal anywhere on the junction box. I'll keep searching around, I'll likely pop in some LED bulbs and see if it prevents the light from blinking (for now).
 
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Old 04-26-13, 03:10 PM
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Actually pcboss, I stuck a phone up there and shot a video and I found it. Does it twist out?
 
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Old 04-26-13, 04:16 PM
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It should be mounted to the J-box with a locknut on the inside. Replacing it should require turning the circuit off, uncovering the J-box, disconnecting the wiring and removing the old thermal protector.

"Installation is the reverse of the above."
 
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Old 04-27-13, 08:17 AM
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I have a quick question, looks like the thermal has three wires coming out of it: black, blue, and white. The black wire connector is the standard twist variety but the blue and white are some sort of crimped type. What's the best way to disconnect the blue and white wires? Remove the crimp (I don't currently know how or have a crimp too) or just cut the wires about half way and twist in the new thermal.

 
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Old 04-27-13, 02:44 PM
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Your option. Cut the wires off near the old thermal and splice onto the wires with wire nuts. Or cut off the crimp connectors and replace with wire nuts.
 
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Old 04-30-13, 03:28 PM
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Well, I replaced all the dimmers with LED compatible dimmers and replaced all the bulbs with LEDs. I get the occasional flicker, about once every 8 hours, but much better than with the CFLs. The flicker is always in the same bulb but doesn't happen often enough to really bother me.

I still don't know if I want to replace the thermal, any reason I should or should not? Does a thermal "going bad" pose any sort of fire hazard?
 
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Old 05-01-13, 02:45 PM
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If the thermal is bad it would not shutoff the power if it were to overheat. This could lead to a fire.
 
 

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