Problems with the Bathroom Fan - No air

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Old 07-05-13, 01:50 AM
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Problems with the Bathroom Fan - No air

We had an idle room fan which we installed in our bathroom. Now the problem is their is no air at all beneath it. Though air can be felt hitting the walls of the bathroom. What can be the issue?
 
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Old 07-05-13, 02:18 AM
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Welcome to the forums! What is your location? What is an "idle room fan". How can there be no air beneath it. Air is everywhere. Give us more details as to what you have.
 
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Old 07-05-13, 03:23 AM
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Ignore the word 'idle'. Was just implying the need to install a large sized fan in the bathroom. Didn't want to buy a new one.

There is no air flowing beneath it after you turn it on. You can feel the air only at the walls.
 
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Old 07-05-13, 03:09 PM
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OK, is this an exhaust fan? Is it a spinning blade fan with large blades? Is it turning counterclockwise when you look up at it? Where are you located?
 
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Old 07-05-13, 03:15 PM
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Its a normal ceiling fan. Not an exhaust one. Its rotating in counterclockwise direction if I view it from below. Can the distance between the blade tip and the wall restrict the airflow completely? Because as of now, its not much to speak.
 
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Old 07-05-13, 03:40 PM
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Yes...distance from the wall and ceiling can affect airflow. Too close and it just keeps sucking the same air in and around.

I've never seen a ceiling fan in a bathroom unless it was a much bigger bath than what most of us are used to.
 
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Old 07-05-13, 09:31 PM
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Can the distance between the blade tip and the wall restrict the airflow completely? Because as of now, its not much to speak.
The minimum distance between the tips of the blades and the nearest obstruction is 30". That means that a 52" fan needs to be installed in the center of a space that is no narrower than 8' 4".

I installed a regular ceiling fan in one of the bathrooms in an old house my ex and I renovated. It was a 30" fan, and the bathroom was 8' wide.

Its rotating in counterclockwise direction if I view it from below... There is no air flowing beneath it after you turn it on. You can feel the air only at the walls.
Clockwise and counterclockwise don't matter. What matters is the pitch of the blades relative to the rotation. If you want the fan to "blow down," the leading edge of each blade needs to be higher than the trailing edge. If you want it to blow up, of course, the opposite is true.

It sounds like you want the fan to blow down in the center. If so, do you have the direction switch on the side of the control housing set so that the fan is rotating with the leading edge of each blade higher than the trailing edge?
 
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Old 07-06-13, 01:54 AM
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Originally Posted by Nashkat1
Clockwise and counterclockwise don't matter. What matters is the pitch of the blades relative to the rotation.
Direction of rotation does matter because ALL ceiling fans are designed to produce downdraft with counterclockwise rotation. It is a standard because right-handed threads are a standard and because downdraft is considered the default mode of operation for a ceiling fan.

Let's keep it simple!
 
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Old 07-06-13, 11:43 AM
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That's not true, Nick. The Hunter Original I installed in the kitchen in my old house never changed rotational direction. To change the direction of the air flow you changed the set of each blade.

It may be true for the new-fangled fans that have directional switches, but not for all fans.
 
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Old 07-06-13, 09:33 PM
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Of course, the two golden exceptions... the Reversaire and Adaptaire.

But, do see my point. All fans with stationary brackets are oriented the same.
 
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Old 07-06-13, 09:53 PM
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But, do see my point. All fans with stationary brackets are oriented the same.
Yeah, I got that. That said, I think the problem here is too much fan in too little space.
 
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