pendant light - more wires and different colours than expected in ceiling


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Old 03-16-14, 08:20 AM
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pendant light - more wires and different colours than expected in ceiling

I would like to install a pendant light in the ceiling of my relatively new condo. There is a place for it above the dining table, but there was no lamp there originally for me to learn from. There is a single red wire, 4 white wires together, 5 green wires together and 5 blue wires together. The lamp has one black, one green and one white. I understand that blue and/or red could be hot - which do I choose? Do I connect the white to the bundle of white and the green to the bundle of green? Can you explain to me why there are so many wires?

Attachment 28387
 
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Old 03-16-14, 08:24 AM
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Name:  ceiling wiring.jpg
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Here is a picture.
 
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Old 03-16-14, 08:26 AM
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Welcome to the forums! A good way to determine whixh wires go where would be to remove the power from the circuit and pull the light switch. If you have a blue and red attached to the switch, then you will connect the pendant's white to the bundle of whites, green to greens, and your lamp black to the red. Your picture didn't post. If the switch configuration is different, post a picture of that as well.

OK pix posted. Let us know about the switch wiring.
 
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Old 03-16-14, 08:27 AM
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I understand that blue and/or red could be hot - which do I choose? Do I connect the white to the bundle of white and the green to the bundle of green? Can you explain
Red wire. The switched wire will almost always be a single wire not gray, white or green. Where you have a group of wires connected together that have an ungrounded conductor color (in this case blue) they are almost always unswitched "hots". Logic: if the switch only controls one light there will only be one wire.
 
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Old 03-18-14, 07:27 AM
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The light switch (or at least the one I'm hoping is for this lamp) is connected to a blue and a red wire. So green to greens, white to whites and black to red?
 
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Old 03-18-14, 09:45 AM
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Yes, light black to house red.
 
 

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