Recessed lighting...HELP


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Old 04-12-14, 10:52 AM
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Recessed lighting...HELP

I just bought a home that was built in 99 and completely remodeled by the previous owners, who were builders. The house looks fantastic but the only thing that perplexes me is the number of outlets and switches in every room. In my living room I have recessed lighting...4 lights, and are all on a different switch in a completely random part of the room. All in all there are 4 switches in this room, all but one containing two switches, and I don't even know what two of them do because they aren't linked to anything (that I can see.) There are also 5 outlets, two auxiliary cables and another something that has been covered with a flat wall plate. Is there ANY way I can clean all this up? I'd like to get rid of the empty wall plate cover, one of the auxiliary jacks, and try and mainstream my recessed lights so they aren't so scattered. Can I put all the dimmer switches on one light plate, or make two lights controlled by one switch? And can I cover up the old cables and empty plate? As you can see I am a beginner, and have no idea what I'm doing!
 
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Old 04-12-14, 12:02 PM
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I don't even know what two of them do because they aren't linked to anything (that I can see.)
You must check both plug-ins at each receptacle using a lamp or multimeter.
I'd like to get rid of the empty wall plate cover,
It must remain if there are 120 volt or 240 volt connections or just live wires capped off behind it.

Some times lights on multiple switches can be combined but it depends on the wiring. Impossible to give an answer without specifics. Pick two lights you want to combine and give us the details at the switches, number of cables, if the cables are 2-conductors or 3-conductor, how they are connected and if there s is a a group of white wires connected only to each other in the switch box. Then we can go from there. We will probably need similar information at the lights also.

If you don't have an analog (not digital) multimeter you should buy one. A cheap $8-$15 one will be fine for this. (A non-contact tester won't give the information you will need.)
 
 

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