Work shop lighting recommendation

Reply

  #1  
Old 05-24-14, 10:35 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Alabama
Posts: 91
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Work shop lighting recommendation

Building a 30' x 50' metal building on concrete floor with metal truss roof structure. Distance from apex of trusses to floor will be 16' - 18'. I don't know what kind of single bulb lighting is out there now, but my preference would be to have 3 to 5 single bulbs spaced at equal truss intervals....with my high desire to have them come on fully bright quickly (instantly)...not like these spawn-of-hell flourescents in my home that take a few minutes to brighten; maddening.

Any recommendations, please?
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 05-24-14, 11:24 AM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 23,464
Received 241 Votes on 222 Posts
Dad-in-law has these type in his machine shed, but they take a bit to warm up.

ValuTekô 400W Metal Halide Low Bay Light - FarmTek

I think if you want immediate light you will be looking at a dozen or more 300 Watt bulbs, or some high dollar commercial LED's like these.
 
  #3  
Old 05-24-14, 02:59 PM
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 21,205
Received 260 Votes on 235 Posts
Is this just going to be a warehouse or are you going to be in there for long periods working? One bright fixture in each bay is OK for general illumination but I find the hard shadows annoying if I'm working on something detailed for long.

Metal halide have a great white color. With your ceiling height more fixtures of lower wattage (250w maybe) would be good. More are better to avoid shadows when you work. Still, I hate the few bright points of light. When I'm working underneath something and looking up if a light is overhead it can be blinding.

I agree that compact fluorescents can take annoyingly long to warm up and come up to full brightness. In my toy car garage I used 8' long VHO fluorescent lights. They are a compromise between having a bucket load of regular fixtures while still avoiding blinding points of light. They are about triple the brightness of regular fluorescents so fewer are needed and their light is spread out over the 8' length so shadows are minimized and it's not as bad if you happen to look directly at one though they are still blindingly bright.
 
  #4  
Old 05-24-14, 03:32 PM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 46,256
Received 139 Votes on 124 Posts
I like the 4' fluorescents in my shop and IMO it's easier to transport and install 4' bulbs. I'm not fond of real bright lights although they do have their uses.
 
  #5  
Old 05-26-14, 07:00 AM
pcboss's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Maryland
Posts: 14,956
Received 33 Votes on 28 Posts
I would look at some of the low bay lighting options available. I think the building will be dark with so few fixtures planned on.
 
  #6  
Old 05-26-14, 08:51 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,967
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
Aside from warm up time, I like the metal halides. Good for all day excursions to the shop. I have a similar shop (under built, granted) at 24x24, and I use 9 ea 4' fluorescent fixtures (t12), which will be changed out to t8's very shortly. Mount them as high as possible to prevent accidental contact like swinging wood, etc. Light travels at 186,000 feet per second, so a few more feet won't make a difference.
 
  #7  
Old 05-29-14, 08:37 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Alabama
Posts: 91
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Late reply to all these solid recommendations; thank you. My builder has advised, as in here, that more is better so he recommends lighting each bay and he says florescent will be hard to beat for light and cost.
 
  #8  
Old 05-29-14, 09:28 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 23,464
Received 241 Votes on 222 Posts
Around here florescents would be a poor choice in an unheated area, but that's because of our cold winters. I doubt you would even notice any problems even in your coldest temps.
 
  #9  
Old 05-30-14, 06:12 AM
Geochurchi's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 4,066
Received 18 Votes on 18 Posts
You could always check at your local electrical supply house and see if their lighting mfgs. have reps. That would be more than happy to visit your site and make some recommendations.
Geo
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: