recessed lighting electrical question


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Old 09-25-14, 07:06 AM
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recessed lighting electrical question

hi guys, quick question.

i removed 8 flourcesent ballast lights from my kitchen and ran 12/2 wire for recessed.

i have 12 of these fixtures i am installing, Shop Utilitech Brushed Nickel with Black Baffle Remodel Recessed Light Kit (Common: 5-in; Actual: 5-in) at Lowes.com

and was wondering if the 15a circuit would be ample to support the wattage with 39w halogen bulbs, the max per housing is 50w i believe.

thanks in advance.
 
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Old 09-25-14, 07:21 AM
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Why #12 on a 15 amp circuit? Is the whole circuit #12 all the way to the breaker box? Is there anything else on the circuit?
was wondering if the 15a circuit would be ample to support the wattage with 39w halogen bulbs, the max per housing is 50w i believe.
Circuit size is based on maximum rated bulb size not size bulb used. You would use l5 amps for the whole circuit so you should be fine assuming no other heavy loads on the circuit.
 

Last edited by ray2047; 09-25-14 at 02:24 PM. Reason: Miscalculated.
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Old 09-25-14, 07:25 AM
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great news, thank you.

i think the outlet for the microwave and dining room light are on this circuit as well after testing turning it off?
 
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Old 09-25-14, 08:45 AM
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hi ray,

the wires coming down from the ceiling were 12/2 so i went with 12/2 romex to keep the same wires, unless i messed that up?

the outlet in the kitchen for the microwave and dining room light are on the circuit as well, i don't think any of the outside ceiling fans (3) total are.
 
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Old 09-25-14, 09:45 AM
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the outlet in the kitchen for the microwave and dining room light are on the circuit as well,
May be grandfathered but not compliant with current code. I would advice running a new circuit for the lights.

Explanation:
  • Under current code nothing but receptacles on the kitchen receptacle circuits.
  • The microwave is a heavy load on a 15 amp circuit. Even disregarding code adding the lights wouldn't be best practice.
 
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Old 09-25-14, 10:19 AM
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would a 20 and circuit be more suiting for all that wattage?
 
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Old 09-25-14, 10:46 AM
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would a 20 and circuit be more suiting for all that wattage?
Only if all the cables are #12 but having lights on it would not be code compliant.
 
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Old 09-25-14, 12:48 PM
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it appears all cables are 12.

i have a set of kitchen lights that were not moved on the side on a 20 amp, (in the ceiling) that are also connected to outlets. this passed a home inspection, now i'm nervous.
 
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Old 09-25-14, 01:03 PM
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Home inspectors are not electricians and as I said may be grandfathered. Nothing to be nervous about. The purpose of the code in this isn't safety but to provide adequate power for modern kitchen appliances.
 
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Old 09-25-14, 01:12 PM
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ok.

the other side of the kitchen has, 10 recessed housings/i think they are cans in that stick into the attic (were here when i purchased the house), 4 outlets, and an extra microwave that run on that particular 20 amp circuit, wall switch controlled.

the new lights would be 12 recessed (soffit type ceiling mounted) 39w bulbs, a few outlets and the main microwave we use all the time. ran off 12/2 wire into a 15a circuit. using the same existing wires from the ceiling that were for the ballast lights.

if the new lights were ran into a 20a circuit that would include the 4 outlets and microwave, would that be more suitable for power and safety?

sorry for repeating myself, just want to make sure i understand.


might have to change the plan, seems the ceiling is only providing 2" gap from top of can to ceiling, and the romex is getting pretty warm, this is what i was using http://www.lowes.com/pd_70133-295-63...7C1&facetInfo=
 

Last edited by dave08527; 09-25-14 at 02:24 PM.
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Old 09-25-14, 02:33 PM
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the new lights would be 12 recessed (soffit type ceiling mounted) 39w bulbs,
Total load is not based on the bulb you use. It is based on the highest wattage the fixture is rated for.
would that be more suitable for power and safety?
Would probably be okay and would be safe but not code compliant.

We tell you here how to wire correctly. Code compliant is the correct way. Best way is a new circuit.

Of course if these cables don't have a ground wire it is a moot point because ungrounded cables can't be extended.
 
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Old 09-25-14, 02:44 PM
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i tried finding the total wattage for the fixture, but doesnt seem to be printed anywhere, on the paperwork, on the fixture nothing.

a new 20a circuit would you recommend?


and the breaker box has all the circuits for the kitchen in the discussion as general lighting/ which includes outlets.
 
 

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