Changing part of light fixture for better lighting?


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Old 12-06-14, 08:57 AM
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Changing part of light fixture for better lighting?

My house is dark and depressing. It has smoked fixtures all over it. I was wondering if I could change just the bottom of the fixtures with something clear to brighten things up. When I remove that smoked glass bottom, it sure gets brighter but don't want to look at the fixture's ugly base either.

I don't want to go through the hassle of replacing all of the fixtures. I don't want to open up a Pandora's box by replacing the fixture because the wiring in the house is rather old.

Any idea whether or not the bottom can be replaced by itself?

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Old 12-06-14, 09:27 AM
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Maybe brighter alternative bulbs that produce more light at less watts such as LED or CFL.

Example: http://www.amazon.com/Feit-Electric-...equivalent+cfl
 
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Old 12-06-14, 12:35 PM
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Any Lowes or HD sells globes shaped like that that do not have that a dark lens.
You do not want a clear one.
 
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Old 12-06-14, 04:01 PM
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@joecaption1

Not following you. I don't want clear (not sure why), but I can get one that isn't dark?

Can you expand please?

Also, what constitutes a fixture?

Thanks
 
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Old 12-06-14, 04:05 PM
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@ray2047....I am already using CFL bulbs (with lower wattage I admit) but I still would like to save the money and see at the same time. The "globe" is really killing the light. It is awful.

Thanks
 
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Old 12-10-14, 09:45 AM
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You'll have to shop around. Also check out specialty lighting stores (as opposed to Home Depot).

You could measure the diameter of the top lip of the existing globe and the overall height of the globe to try to find something that fits. There is a good chance you could find a frosted or rippled otherwise clear glass replacement globe.

Get one with the hole already in the middle. It is not easy to drill a hole yourself, too much of a chance of breaking the glass.

It is not too difficult to get a new center post in case the new glass globe is deeper or shallower than the original. Or you might be able to screw the original post in or out a little to adjust its protruding length.
 
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Old 12-10-14, 11:08 AM
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rather than change fixtures, just get higher watt bulbs
 
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Old 12-10-14, 02:27 PM
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rather than change fixtures, just get higher watt bulbs
It is not always that simple. Most fixtures have a maximum wattage bulb that can be used in the fixture. The process you describe creates the easy bake oven effect that slowly cooks the life out of the insulation and caused it to fail. I strongly suspect those fixtures shown already require 90 degree C rated insulation that the OP does not have. If so those fixtures should not have even been installed.
 
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Old 12-10-14, 03:08 PM
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I don't want to go through the hassle of replacing all of the fixtures
I would seriously consider changing out these fixtures one or two at a time. I work on many older homes, and you are right about the lack of light.
For example, if the above fixture was the only one in a kitchen, that's terrible lighting.

The light would even be insufficient in a bedroom IMO.

Add to that what Boss stated, the fixtures are probably dangerous anyway. If you live in an older home, the cable in the ceiling cannot handle the temperatures this fixture would generate.

I live in a 1950's home. Back when I did change my ceiling fixtures, I found hard, brittle, cracked wire. Not the best thing, so it was changed out.

You don't want a clear lens (globe) because the light can be distracting and in some cases, almost blinding.
 
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Old 12-10-14, 05:25 PM
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You might do well with a semi-recessed fixture like this.



We had similar fixtures to what you have and replaced them with this type.
The shade diffuses the light so you aren't blinded when looking at them but the top is open allowing the light to fill the room.
 
 

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