Wiring a homemade chandelier


  #1  
Old 12-28-14, 11:59 AM
D
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 3
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Wiring a homemade chandelier

I'm making a multi light chandelier that consists of 10 individual sockets hanging from a board that will be wired in parallel. I will be using 10 -25 watt bulbs. I planned to use 18 gauge twisted wire. The wires will be joined inside a small junction box on the top side of the board and then wired from there up the supporting chain to the ceiling.

will I exceed the limits of the 18 gauge wire?
will I need a larger gauge wire to go from the fixture to the ceiling?
The sockets do not have a ground connection. Is this correct?
 
  #2  
Old 12-28-14, 01:11 PM
D
Member
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: United States
Posts: 6
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
I was curious what responses this would get. I'm no electrician but isn't minimum 14 ga in most areas? I don't think you would have an issue with the load you describe based on some simple ohms law calculations. You should end up drawing around 2.3A. Not sure about the safest way to connect so many wires though. That could be quite a bundle.
 
  #3  
Old 12-28-14, 01:14 PM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 29,711
Upvotes: 0
Received 15 Upvotes on 13 Posts
What type of wire do you mean when you write 18 gauge twisted wire.?
 
  #4  
Old 12-28-14, 02:33 PM
D
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 3
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
It is insulated 18gauge wire covered in cotton fabric and twisted in pairs
The wire in the ceiling is 14 gauge. I did not think I would have to go that heavy since the chandelier that is hanging there now appears to be wired with 18 gauge. It has 5 25 watt bulbs and one 60 watt spot.
 
  #5  
Old 12-29-14, 12:02 PM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 29,711
Upvotes: 0
Received 15 Upvotes on 13 Posts
If the wire is sold as lamp fixture wire rated for 150 volts or more it should be okay for the individual sockets but because of the number of bulbs I would probably go with #14 minimum from the junction box where the individual lamp holder supplies are joined together. A bit of over engineering never hurts. Nothing to prevent someone else from putting in larger bulbs. Remember neutrals and hots must not be mixed. If the wire does not have an identifier on one of the two wires that can be difficult.
 
  #6  
Old 12-29-14, 01:51 PM
D
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 3
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Thanks ray that is good advice
 
  #7  
Old 12-29-14, 05:45 PM
GregH's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Manitoba
Posts: 9,500
Received 68 Upvotes on 62 Posts
If you are making an ungrounded lamp you should use a polarized plug.

Some lamp cord comes with one conductor ribbed.
The ribbed conductor should be the neutral and connected to the shell of the lamp holder or a white wire.
The smooth conductor would be connected to the hot terminal which would be a gold screw or a black wire.

Another style of lamp cord comes with colored wire.
Gold wire would be connected to the hot side and the silver the neutral.
 
  #8  
Old 12-29-14, 06:05 PM
Tolyn Ironhand's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: United States
Posts: 14,495
Received 915 Upvotes on 773 Posts
Building luminaries (light fixtures) is a violation of the NEC:

From 2011 NEC:
410.6 Listing required. All Luminaries and Lamp-holders shall be listed.

Art 100 - Definitions: Luminaire. A complete lighting unit consisting of a light source such as a lamp or lamps, together with the parts designed to position the light source and connect it to the power supply. It may also include parts to protect the light source, or the ballast, or to distribute the light. A lampholder itself if not a Luminaire.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: