how many lumens do I really need?


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Old 03-02-15, 01:05 PM
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how many lumens do I really need?

I am putting in new lighting in our kitchen. The room layout has completely changed as well as the location of the fixtures so I can't just use what I had. I have 10 recessed cans, 3 pendants and under-cabinet lighting. I am focused on the cans right now. I bought 670 lumen LED lamps for the 6" cans. "Friends" suggested that I go for the highest lumens and can always use a dimmer. That would have me putting in 1300 lumen lamps instead. I have targeted 2700k for color. Options that I have considered are:

23w, 1300 lumens
6 x Luminus 5" 6" 23W LED Recessed Dimmable Retrofit Can Light Kit 1300 Lumens | eBay


11w 670 lumens
Commercial Electric 5 in. and 6 in. White Recessed LED Trim with 90 CRI, 2700K-CER6730AWH27 - The Home Depot


Both prices and specs are otherwise similar so I figure I am choosing based on lumens. Will I really be happier with the brighter bulbs (and maybe a dimmer)?

- Peter
 
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Old 03-02-15, 01:27 PM
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Will I really be happier with the brighter bulbs (and maybe a dimmer)?
In theory.... yes. However, the LED's don't always provide the same color when they are dimmed. This would probably need to be tried to know for sure.

The same color rating between brands can even look different.
 
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Old 03-02-15, 02:30 PM
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Several stores may have a demo fixture that you might be able to look at the dimming affect of the led bulbs. I know we have such a display model available. But I agree brighter is usually better.
 
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Old 03-02-15, 04:13 PM
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I'm getting older and my eyes are aging right along with me and there are times when I want it brighter than bright...I would go with the higher lumen and dimmer.

I also wonder about your temperature choice. 2700K is really at the low end. More like a soft white incandescent. I haven't really looked at LEDs too much as I'm renting now and not willing to spend the premium, but something around 3500K is what I like for general illumination. I know up in the 5000K area is far to harsh for most people.

Much depends on the kitchen design. Dark or light cabinets? Dark or light counter tops? What kind of flooring and paint?
 
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Old 03-02-15, 04:25 PM
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Clear maple cabinetry. Dark granite, light porcelain tile, stainless steel appliances. I could go to 3000k but really trying to stay away from the white of commercial lighting (3500k and higher). I think 2700k most closely matches the incandescent look. I don't want to light it up like a restaurant kitchen.

Peter
 
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Old 03-03-15, 03:35 AM
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pjaffe, Yes you are correct in your color choice. The 2700 temp is closet to what we are use to in our homes (that yellowish type light). But in a kitchen you may want a bit higher because the kitchen tends to be a work shop in a sense.
 
 

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