Question about electrical boxes in a finished ceiling


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Old 03-13-15, 10:55 AM
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Question about electrical boxes in a finished ceiling

I have a house that was built in 1963. I am remodelling my basement and I removed the ceiling tiles that were installed. I found several junction boxes in the space between the joists. I am planning on running some new wiring since the wiring is old. It has the type with the silver looking finish on the wiring sheath. What is the best way to deal with a junction box? Should I just run new wire back to the panel? I"m also planning on replacing the lights with can lights and tying them together. This may get rid of most of the junction boxes. Can you crimp the wires with the metal copper sleeves and then hide it? I can't seem to find an answer other than you have to be able to access them. If that's the case then I think I'll be running a little more wire that I thought. What would one normally do if they were not planning on running new wiring? Would you just have to put in an access panel in the ceiling?

Thanks in advance
Billy
 
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Old 03-13-15, 11:25 AM
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Can you crimp the wires with the metal copper sleeves and then hide it?
No. All connections must remain assessable. They can not be buried.
I removed the ceiling tiles that were installed. I found several junction boxes in the space between the joists.
That was never code compliant if you mean the 12x12 tiles that are glued or stapled in place.
 
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Old 03-13-15, 11:31 AM
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Welcome to the forums! As long as you plan to keep the drop ceiling, you can have the junction boxes up there. They must remain covered and accessible. It is always best to run the wiring all the way back to the panel whenever possible. Your cabling may or may not have a grounding wire, and you need that. You should use wire nuts to complete your junction box connections whether it be in actual junction boxes or in the boxes of the lights you choose. They provide a connection as well as insulation around the wires. Crimping is not used due to the fact wrapping tape around them is often not sufficient and will degrade with heat and time.
 
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Old 03-13-15, 12:10 PM
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Thanks for the prompt reply. Yes, there were 12" tiles stapled in place and I'm actually going back with sheetrock so I'll get rid of those boxes and run wiring back to the panel. Luckily my panel is in an adjacent room to the basement I'm working on so not very long pulls.

Billy
 
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Old 03-13-15, 12:57 PM
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I was thinking removable ceiling tiles, so go with Ray's suggestion. Wire from the panel to the lights, daisy chained, so any connections you have will be in the integrated junction boxes. Let us know if you have more questions.
 
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Old 03-14-15, 05:15 PM
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A junction box for a recessed light is considered accessible.
 
 

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