UVC light installation


  #1  
Old 04-03-15, 05:12 AM
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UVC light installation

Hi Everyone,

I am planning to install two UVC lights inside the ductwork of my HRV system(heat recovery ventilator).
The UVC lights i will be using are Philips TUV 36T5 HO 4P SE UNP.
And i believe i should be using this driver/ballast to drive the UVC lights.

Driver info:[table="width: 100, class: grid, align: left"]
[tr]
[td]No. of Lamps[/td]
[td]Input Volts[/td]
[td]Lamp Starting Method[/td]
[td]Ballast Family[/td]
[td]Catalog Number[/td]
[td]Input Power ANSI(Watts)[/td]
[td]Max.THD%[/td]
[td]Line Current (Amps)[/td]
[td]Min. Starting Temp. (F /C)[/td]
[td]Dim.[/td]
[td]Wiring Diag. [/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]1[/td]
[td]120-277[/td]
[td]PS[/td]
[td]PureVOLT[/td]
[td]IUV-2S60-M4-LD[/td]
[td]80[/td]
[td]10[/td]
[td]0.69-0.30[/td]
[td]0/-18[/td]
[td]Size 4[/td]
[td]160[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]2[/td]
[td]120-277[/td]
[td]PS[/td]
[td]PureVOLT[/td]
[td]IUV-2S60-M4-LD[/td]
[td]155[/td]
[td]10[/td]
[td]1.30-0.56[/td]
[td]0/-18[/td]
[td]Size 4[/td]
[td]159[/td]
[/tr]
[/table]

so my questions are :
1). I am powering two UVC lamps with one driver. What voltage should i be supplying to the driver? 120v or 240v? if i supply 120v to the driver, it would draw around 1.3 amps right? and if i supply 240v to the driver, it would draw around 0.64 amps right?

2). What types of light socket should i be using? 4 pin UV resistant light socket? where can i find them online?

3. i believe i should install an external pilot light that indicates the lamps are functioning. Are there any already made device like that?

4. It would be great if you guys can share some of your UV light installation experience(good/bad) with me. =)

Thank you guys. =)
 
  #2  
Old 04-03-15, 11:58 AM
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According to some of the HVAC technicians that post here UV lights are pretty much useless. I would use a current-operated switch to monitor the current flow to the lights and set to open the monitor circuit if one bulb burnt out.
 
  #3  
Old 04-04-15, 08:55 PM
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Hi Furd
Thank you for your reply.
Are you saying i should use a current operated switch instead of a light driver/ballast?
Which current operated switch would you recommend?
Do you have more information where i can look at it online?

Thank you
 
  #4  
Old 04-04-15, 10:30 PM
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Actually, I am advising you to forget about UV lights as they are relatively ineffective due to the air not having enough time exposed to the UV radiation to effectively kill the bacteria.

HOWEVER, if you decide to go ahead with the project I am advising you to install a current-operated switch to give you an indication when one or more of the bulbs burn out. I don't know what a "driver" or "ballast" may do as far as indicating the bulb is no longer functioning but a current-operated switch can be adjusted to operated at the amount of current that all bulbs connected would require so if one burnt out the current would be less and actuate the switch. Go an Internet search for "current operated switch" (use the quotation marks) for more information.
 
  #5  
Old 04-10-15, 03:25 AM
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Hi Furd
Thank you for your reply.
Yes, i am aware of the air duration problem.
I will also make a indoor air circulation UV filter.
In my application, i need all the edges i can get.

Anyway, thank you for the information about the current operated switch. =)
 
 

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