Ceiling fan support

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Old 05-13-15, 04:55 PM
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Ceiling fan support

I wanted to replace my existing ceiling fan (installed by the previous owner)with another one. After removing the old ceiling fan, I noticed the metal octagon box was mounted to a piece of 1X4 with two drywall screws.



The joists are 2X6 spaced 24" apart. Then they ran 1X4 furring strips across the bottom of the rafters, then the 3/4" ceiling sheetrock is attached to the 1X4 furring strips.

The previous owner drilled a 1/2" hole through this 1X4 furring strip, then mounted an octagon box to the underside of the 1X4, then mount the ceiling fan to it. It have worked for many years, but now I am wondering if this 1X4 is strong enough?

Should I put back the octagon box and mount the new ceiling fan (about the same weight) and be done with it?

Or should I go up to the attic (it's a very hot attic now in Miami plus fiberglass insulation) and mount a 2X4 across?

Or should I just cut the 1X4 out. and use one of those tension mount support bar through the hole and tighten below?
 
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Old 05-13-15, 05:05 PM
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That doesn't look like 1x4 furring..... it looks more like 1x2 or 1x3.

I would go up to the attic and add another piece of wood behind the furring and then attach the new piece of wood at both ends to the joists.

I'm a little leery of an expansion bracket system on 24" OC joists. I'd much rather add the wood if possible.
 
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Old 05-13-15, 05:06 PM
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I would not re-use that existing furring strip. I would grin and bear the heat and go into the crawl space and make a frame on 16" centers (or other suitable but strong framing) then use the tension mount boxes meant for a fan mounting.
 
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Old 05-13-15, 05:09 PM
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The hole in the sheetrock is about 4.5" in diameter, so it looks like a 1X4 to me (3.5").

Looks like I have to make a trip into the attic...I don't like doing that. It's hot as hell, and every time I go up there I find things I don't want to find.
 
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Old 05-13-15, 05:33 PM
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Was this the same person that did your service?
Just curious.
Geo
 
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Old 05-13-15, 05:47 PM
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Was this the same person that did your service?
Just curious.
Geo
All these are existing conditions of a home I purchased, so I am just now discovering things as I peel back one layer here, one layer there.
 
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Old 05-14-15, 09:34 AM
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When you have furring like that it causes an immediate problem as the sheetrock is automatically 3/4" or so off the joists. The old work fan box relies on being flush with the rock.

I mentioned putting wood above the furring. I'd stand a piece of 2x6 up and fasten it between the joists. Fasten the box thru the furring and into the 2x6.
 
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Old 05-14-15, 07:33 PM
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first, my back hurts LOL. I was in the attic and it must be 120 degrees in there, and several times hit my back against the roofing nails sticking out of the roof deck on the inside, crawling over the fiberglass insulation...

I am glad I went to investigate further...because PJmax said it's not a 1X4 and I could clearly see from below it's a 1X4...and from the attic hatch with a flash light I saw what I thought was furring as many of the houses down here built in the 60s and 70s all had furring strips attached to the bottom of the joists, then the sheetrock. However those were usually 1X3 furring strips not 1X4.

So I went into the attic and crawled over to that spot and wow...I saw the ends of two Tapcon screws sticking up through the 1X4. This makes absolutely no sense! I then noticed then 1X4 were NOT a strip of wood that runs across all the joists, it only went between the two joists.

I went back downstairs and chipped away a little bit of the brown coat over the gypsum, and I exposed the heads of the two Tapcon screws.

So, someone drilled a 4" hole, cut a strip of 1X4, pushed the strip through the hole, then positioned it across the back of the ceiling, and secured the piece of wood from below, through the ceiling board, with two Tapcon screws, then mounted an octagon box to that strip, pretending it would serve as adequate support for a ceiling fan!!!

The octagon box is 1.5" deep, with a mud ring 1/2", so total 2". I cut a piece of 2X4 but raised it 2" above the finished ceiling surface, secured to the adjacent joists. So that's done.

I then started to think...I wonder how the other ceiling fans were attached. So I actually went to take down three other ceiling fans, just to check them out to make sure they are OK. Two of them are OK, because the position of the hole is right where a joist was, so they just mounted a shallow box to the underside of the joist. The last one the ceiling fan was mounted to a old work support bar but it was one designed for a light fixture not a fan, so I took another trip into the attic and removed and redid that as well.
 
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Old 05-14-15, 08:20 PM
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Excellent! Hard work but well worth it. Job well done.
 
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