outdoor lighting for really cold weather -25 Fahrenheit

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Old 09-26-15, 07:42 PM
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outdoor lighting for really cold weather -25 Fahrenheit

I need something for a garage plywood soffit nicer than 2-headed floods. And, most important, a reliable minimum starting temperature of -25 F.

I have looked at every retrofit LED "disk light" fixture in the big box stores and online. They all seem to be for indoor only, even where stated as indoor/outdoor. Where a minimum temp is given, it is generally 0 F or -4 F. Most don't give a temp. I emailed a couple of companies and they confirmed a minimum of 0 F.

At some places on the internet, LEDs are said to be good for cold temps, and even work better in cold temps. But when you are looking for specific applications in a light fixture, I can't find any that are rated for lower than 0 F.

I am fine with incandescent recessed cans. I am after that look. But these require noncombustible materials, which plywood is not.

I guess my question is: what do you use in Alaska, Hudson Bay, Sweden ... ?

Gary
 
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Old 09-27-15, 08:00 AM
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IC-rated recessed light combustibles clearance

My preference is to flush mount an LED on a jbox, but I am not finding any way to do this reliably for outdoor lighting in a cold climate. So I am reconsidering cutting a round hole in the plywood, inserting a metal recessed can, and using incandescent as long as they are available.

Even where the codes now allow direct contact with combustibles (plywood in this case) around the circumference, it would seem best to avoid this. Any recommendations for adding a measure of safety when installing ICs this way?
 
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Old 09-27-15, 04:02 PM
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How often will you turn them on and for how long?

I'd bet that running LEDs 24/7/365 would still use less electricity than having incandescent lights on only when dark.

My LED porch light has been on since the day I installed it. I also have two cheap LED lights on the front of my house that are on dusk-to-dawn sensors that I haven't had any trouble with but they've only seen -15f so far.

If I were you I'd probably go with whatever LED I liked the best regardless of rating. To me they all seem better at cold starting than anything that came before them.
 
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