Not sure what replacement bulb to buy.


  #1  
Old 02-05-16, 06:23 AM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 163
Received 6 Upvotes on 4 Posts
Not sure what replacement bulb to buy.

I have an outdoor lighted snowflake (that uses the mini type sting light bulbs) and has burned out almost 1/2 of it's bulbs. I tried replacing them with some spare bulbs I had from an old light set, but those are no where near as bright as the originals.

The tag on the electrical cord says to use 3v (.42amp) replacement bulbs. But I can't seem to find any with those specifications? There are about 42 bulbs in this light and the replacement bulbs I used were from an old 100 ct. light set (which my guess is why they aren't as bright?)

Anyone know where I can find this size bulb or if I can use a different size? (Googling didn't return any in the 3v -.42 amp size).

Thanks!
 
  #2  
Old 02-05-16, 08:19 AM
C
Member
Join Date: May 2015
Location: USA
Posts: 3,191
Received 176 Upvotes on 144 Posts
Can you post a picture of a bulb? 3v is an odd voltage for the mini lights, as you have found.

Any way you can just buy a string of 50 bulbs and replace the whole string, wires, sockets, and all? Might be the easiest path.
 
  #3  
Old 02-05-16, 07:52 PM
A
Member
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 4,583
Upvotes: 0
Received 288 Upvotes on 263 Posts
I have seen 3 volt replacement mini Christmas tree bulbs years ago and they look the same as replacement bulbs of other voltages. They go with "40 light one way" or "120 light 3 way" sets.

A 50 light set uses 2-1/2 volt bulbs (also probably look the same). While you might take 42 bulbs out of a 50 light set and put them all in your 42 light star unit, you will get uniform brightness but shorter bulb life because putting 42 2-1/2 volt bulbs in one circuit results in some overvoltage for each bulb.

If you can't find 40 light sets, maybe you can find 30 light set. Again, replace all of the bulbs at once using new bulbs from two other sets that match each other.

The instructions with some light sets concisely and conveniently say to use bulbs of a certain voltage but if the amperage is not the same you will get other unpredictable results including short life for the new bulbs or shorter life for the remaining old bulbs.

.
 
  #4  
Old 02-05-16, 08:35 PM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Jersey
Posts: 65,710
Received 4,106 Upvotes on 3,687 Posts
If you notice all sets today are 50 lights or multiples of 50. I don't think you'll find any small count incandescent strings. Most of those have been replaced by LED.

The only replacement bulbs I found were 3.5v. That means your snowflake will not be as bright as it once was.

Now...they're called superbright but will not be in your application.
3.5V Super Bright Mini Replacement Bulbs - Hard to Find Items

These are on eBay. If you decide to go this way.... contact the seller regarding shipping first.
3 5V Replacement Light Bulb 5pk Clear | eBay

The eBay link also has 2.5v bulbs listed. Those will be superbright but not last very long.
 
  #5  
Old 02-06-16, 08:08 AM
A
Member
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 4,583
Upvotes: 0
Received 288 Upvotes on 263 Posts
Super brights use more amperes compared with regular bulbs of the same voltage.

You could use 3.5 volt superbrights provided you replace all 42 bulbs at the same time.

I would say that, with 3.5 volt super bright bulbs at the existing 2.9 volts (120 volt source) you would have a good chance of getting close to the brightness of the original 3.0 volt bulbs.
 
  #6  
Old 02-06-16, 08:17 AM
A
Member
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 4,583
Upvotes: 0
Received 288 Upvotes on 263 Posts
The replacement bulbs you tried so far were dimmer because they had a lower internal resistance and wanted more amps than the other bulbs in the circuit would let through. The end result was that the voltage to each bulb re-balanced in a different manner giving the new bulbs fewer volts each.
 
  #7  
Old 02-07-16, 09:42 AM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 163
Received 6 Upvotes on 4 Posts
Thanks to everyone who replied in trying to help me with the replacing of those bulbs! While this snowflake light wasn't anything expensive, the effort in trying to replace the bulbs might be more than it's worth! Think I may just wait until next year and purchase a new one.

Never would have guessed that those bulbs would be so difficult to find!

Thanks again!
 
  #8  
Old 02-07-16, 10:23 AM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 29,711
Upvotes: 0
Received 15 Upvotes on 13 Posts
You might email 1000bulbs.com and ask if they have them.
 
  #9  
Old 02-07-16, 11:58 AM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Jersey
Posts: 65,710
Received 4,106 Upvotes on 3,687 Posts
The link I left to eBay was a $1 for five bulbs. That wouldn't be too expensive if you could arrive at a fair shipping price..... certainly not $7 a bid like they're asking.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: