Light bulbs not what they used to be?


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Old 04-02-16, 01:01 PM
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Light bulbs not what they used to be?

Is it just me? Or are the quality of today's Light bulb crap. (both kinds)
Might it be the big box store brands Lowes, & HD… Reveal? Seems I am constantly changing them. Now on the other hand I have some outdoor lights the bigger spot and flood lights that I have had original since I moved into my house for over 16 years ago? Go figure??
Seems the same goes for the longer 4 ft. incandescent ones also??
 
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Old 04-02-16, 02:34 PM
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Incandescents are on the way out, as you know, so even finding them is a task sometimes. I would wonder, too, why you haven't changed to LED or CFL's yet. Better lighting, tremendously longer life and energy savings. And I am sure you are talking about 4' FLUORESCENT bulbs. They last moderately long, but they, combined with a weaker link ballast makes LED's more favorable, too.
 
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Old 04-02-16, 02:41 PM
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What Larry says. But I'll go even further and discount CFL's completely. LED's are very good but name brand like GE will yield better results. Also regardless of what kind of bulb one uses, repeated turning on and off will reduce the life by a significant amount.
 
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Old 04-02-16, 03:03 PM
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I am no fan of many store brands. I have some old bulbs from when I first built my house in 2002 that are still going strong while the compact fluorescents seem to need annual replacement.
 
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Old 04-04-16, 09:04 AM
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Yes Larry I did mean 4' florescent. ??? HMM How did my post get in machinery I thought it was in lighting and light fixtures Admin. Please feel free to move it!
sorry
 
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Old 04-04-16, 09:07 AM
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In looking at the 60-watt equivalent LED's in the big box stores, I've noticed that many of them nowadays show an estimated design life of around 10 years. Not too long ago, most of them indicated a design life of 23+ years. I don't know if the quality of LED's is being sacrificed as the price comes down, or that estimated lifetimes are becoming more realistic. I've also wondered that if you use a (dimmable) LED bulb on a dimmer, will the service life be increased, as is the case with incandescent bulbs?
 
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Old 04-04-16, 12:16 PM
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If you look at the fine print the design life is base on something like an 8 hour day not a 24 hour day. Maybe they increased the hours in their imaginary day which shortened their year.
 
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Old 04-04-16, 12:48 PM
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LEDs rarely outright fail but they DO have reduced output as they age. As I recall the "lifespan" was originally set to the point where they were outputting approximately 60% of the lumens they originally output.

Now for me a 40% drop in lumens would be a big deal but maybe it comes so gradually most people don't notice it...until they put in a new bulb. Since very few people replace bulbs that still work the manufacturer's can get away with this subterfuge.


In the "for what it's worth" department, my house has mostly recessed ceiling lights and I would say that about half of them are the same bulbs that were installed when I bought this place in December of 1999. I have found that the reflector CFL lamps have a VERY poor lifetime, less than 100 hours in most cases for me. I have one LED in my kitchen, one LED in my bedroom, one LED in my "project" room and just last week tried LEDs in my living room. I have two recessed fixtures over my couch and with one LED and one incandescent the lousy Lutron dimmer (with IR remote) works okay. Replacing the incandescent with a second LED and it will not go out, both LEDS sit on dim.
 
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Old 04-04-16, 12:58 PM
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Hole in the wall 99 cent stores still have incandescent bulbs. CFLs are the worst. LEDs are good but the cost is higher than incandescents. It made it hard on people with less of an income or no income at all. We have had this conversation before. Someone stated that the cost difference in only a few $ but to some, it's still too high.
 
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Old 04-04-16, 01:20 PM
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Pulpo, I think you will agree with me that this is another case of politicians mandating things that they know nothing about. I say let the manufacturers do the innovation and advertising of the new ideas and then let the populace vote with their wallets. The good ideas will flourish and the bad ideas will die their deserved death.

Shortly after I moved into my present house I installed a photocell on my front outside lights, one on each side of my garage door and one at the front door. these fixtures all took 60 watt bulbs and would last about three months before burning out. When I saw 9 watt CFL bulbs on sale I bought three and replaced the incandescents. That move dropped my already modest electrical billing by about $2.50 a month ($5. per billing period.) Over the ensuing years I have gone back and forth between 9 watt and 11 watt models, depending on which were on sale. Last time I bought a slew of them because at 99 cents a six pack they were the cheapest thing I could use. (The 99 cent thing was because of a utility grant and it wasn't even my serving utility!) I've had some of these CFLs last for more than three years and a very few that didn't last even one year.

I tried an LED lamp once and it offered ZERO illumination to the area although I could clearly see the bulb from the other end of the driveway. I suspect that current models would be far better but I have enough CFLs to last through the next decade. I don't have any problem in disposing of the burnt out CFLs because my county runs a free hazardous waste dump and I merely collect all my flashlight (and other) batteries as well as all fluorescent lamps and make a trip (combined to other locations as well) once or twice a year.

Now while the CFLs are clearly saving me money (I have them in the bathrooms as well) the initial cost of the LEDs is still high enough that I doubt that the electrical savings has caught up to the capital cost yet. Still, I prefer the bright white light from the LEDs over the yellowish light from most CFLs and incandescents. I know, most women feel the opposite.

I could go on but I'll save the rest for another time.
 
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Old 04-04-16, 01:31 PM
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Most, maybe all of the little stores around here no longer sell incandescent bulbs. Actually I did see several packages for sell recently but they were only 25 watt. For me the old incandescent bulbs made sense and were what, about 25¢ a piece? My wife hates CFLs and they run about $1 each. We haven't tried LEDs as I balk at the price. When they said incandescents were going out - I stocked up! Except for a pack of rough service bulbs out in my shop, I installed my last incandescent a few weeks ago
 
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Old 04-04-16, 01:53 PM
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I think the last time I bought some A-19 (standard pear-shaped) incandescents it was a couple of dollars for a two-pack and that was several years ago.

My sister also hates CFLs but she begrudgingly allowed me to install a couple of high lumen output ones in her garage because otherwise a candle would have given more light. I did notice the other day that she now has yellow (bug repellent) CFLs in her porch lights. Since she so detests anything but incandescents I stocked up on incandescent reflector bulbs for her recessed ceiling lights when I saw them on sale.

I remember when I was in my teens and installed the first fluorescent fixture in the garage my daddy hated it. He had always used 300 watt incandescent bulbs, sometimes two in a Y adapter. I don't think it was a full month before he wanted to replace all the shop lighting with fluorescents.
 
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Old 04-04-16, 02:35 PM
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Several of the dollar and discount stores around here sold incandescent bulbs for $1 per 4 pack or $1.50 per 6 pack. Now the cheapest I've found is a 4 pack of CFLs for $4 or 4 halogens [that look like incandescents] for $5.

Funny how SS claims there is no inflation but everything costs more today ..... or comes in a smaller package. I even noticed on the last 'gallon' of bleach we bought that it says to use 2 cups - didn't it use to be 1 cup per load?
 
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Old 04-04-16, 03:08 PM
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Pulpo, I think you will agree with me that this is another case of politicians mandating things that they know nothing about.
That's 99% correct. The missing 1% is that they know what generates more revenue for manufacturers & tax.
 
 

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