Strange LED issue


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Old 04-11-16, 08:48 AM
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Strange LED issue

My only experience with LED lighting issues is from this forum, some problems like interference with garage door openers and such. Well, several months ago I cut the cable and switched to an over the air antenna and after dancing on the roof a few times I got it pointed to where I could get all of my channels. But, there were 2, good ones, that were borderline. Weather seemed to be able to take the signal down just enough that they would drop out.

Well, the other day, heavy winds, those two channels became unwatchable. I assumed the wind had changes something on my end or at the transmitter. I'll cut this short.

I had also rearranged some stuff and wondered if the proximity of my coax and electrical wires mattered so began to move things back. In the process I wondered if it might be the LED bulb I read under. Did some testing and installed an old incandescent bulb and GOT MY SIGNAL BACK.

The lamp was inherited and has a zip cord with a cheap replacement plug, 2-wire. The lamp pole and base are metal so I'm considering wiring in a 3-wire cord (I have a ton of then) and grounding the metal portion of the lamp.

There is one catch. The chair I sit in is a motorized recliner and when I operate that motor it wipes out those 2 channels. I ran an extension cord for the chair into another room, same issue. So I don't know if the problem is coming over the power line or over tha air.

Thoughts.

Bud
 
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Old 04-11-16, 09:01 AM
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I'll cut this short.
It's too late for that.

The chair I sit in is a motorized recliner and when I operate that motor it wipes out those 2 channels.
I know a cheap self made millionaire who refuses to pay for cable TV. To watch ABC, he has to open the blinds. Have you tried that? Anyway, do you have a digital antenna? How old is your TV? Does it accept a digital signal or do you need a converter box?
 
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Old 04-11-16, 09:11 AM
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My thought is that it's more likely to be radiated interference than conducted (power line). You may want to try another brand of LED lamp and see if that helps. Grounding the shell of the lamp may help; worth a try.

May not be much you can do about the chair if it is radiated interference.

If your antenna is omnidirectional you may consider trying a yagi or other directional style if your stations are mostly in the same direction. Anything you can do to increase the signal strength of the stations you are trying to receive (better antenna) will help reduce the effects of local interference.
 
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Old 04-11-16, 09:38 AM
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after dancing on the roof a few times I got it pointed to where I could get all of my channels.
Better to put a motor on it so you can adjust from your easy chair. I use rabbit ears and have to adjust direction between some channels and the actual direction can vary with weather. Remember also despite the original intent for all digital stations to be UHF some stations fought that and are still really VHF so your antenna must be good at both UHF and VHF.
 
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Old 04-11-16, 10:07 AM
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@Pulpo, that was short 
Digital tv and antenna, not converter box. RG59 is what I had around so used that, 30' right above me.

@Paul, I don't like the 2-wire zip cord anyway, so it will be changed, but I agree, probably radiated interference. TV light and chair are all within arms reach. I will try moving the TV about 10 feet away (won't be able to hear it or read the CC but long enough to see if it improves the signal issue.

Stations are about 180 apart so this antenna catches both. May have to go up another 10 or more feet, just above the roof now, where I could reach it.

Tried 2 different LEDs and even one CFL, same results.

@Ray, hoping to avoid a motor as we only have a few stations and this antenna actually works fine. The test signal says I want a 60 and it is running 58 to 62 and solid on the 2 difficult stations. Other stations are 80 and above.

Thanks,
I'll let you know if anything makes it better. But LED issues are unfortunate and will be nice to know what is happening.

Bud
 
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Old 04-11-16, 11:38 AM
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Might be worth trying RG 6 quad shield. Bandwidth on RG59 drops off faster and the quad shield will reduce coupling into the cable. It may improve signal strength enough to make a difference.
 
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Old 04-11-16, 01:38 PM
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There is no such thing as a "digital" antenna. ALL antennae work by resonating with the electromagnetic spectrum to amplify a minute electrical current. That the signal is pulsed (digital) rather than continuous (analog) is irrelevant.

Now here is the straight skinny...UHF signals have a shorter range than do VHF signals. UHF is much more "line-of-sight" than is VHF. UHF signals are more prone to drop out and multi-path interference than are VHF signals. All this means is that UHF is a less-desirable medium for transmission of television signals than is VHF. Unfortunately, the FCC removed the so-called "low band" VHF spectrum from use by the television broadcasters forcing most of them to the UHF bands. In addition, many broadcasters are now broadcasting on a fraction of the power they had prior to the digital revolution. The result is that digital signals have pretty much two states, high quality or unwatchable.

Add in that most internal tuners, as well as most "digital converters" are at best fairly insensitive and non-selective and you have compounded the problem. These tuners are of lesser quality not because "they" don't know how to build them better but because the majority of television programming in the US is provided via a "wired" (cable) system rather than over the air. Most cable systems don't even bother using the TV's tuner but instead forces the subscriber to use a "set-top box" (STB) to change channels. Why build in a high quality tuner if it won't be used?

Weather plays a significant role in the area of over-the-air reception regardless of what some "authorities" tell us. So do large aircraft. Trees are often an impediment to a clear signal.

Depending on the time of day or night, the wind, the rain, the antenna orientation and any airline traffic I can get my TV to recognize fifty or more channels during a scan. Of these, there will be at least a third that will receive no watchable signal at all but they still register as an available channel. Most of the broadcast antennae in my area are concentrated to the south by southwest of me, roughly 200 degrees magnetic although there are a few that are as far off as 133 degrees magnetic that I can receive with reasonable reliability. Most are less than fifteen miles but one as far as 35 miles. Strangely, I can point my (directional) antenna straight at the antenna of one broadcaster that has two different channels (not side-by-side) and receive one channel at a signal strength of 9 (out of ten) bars while the second channel is barely making 3 bars and often breaks up. Another channel, this one nine "physical channels" below the prior is totally unwatchable even though the transmitter power is greater and the transmission tower is only one degree offset from the first.

What makes this even more puzzling is that a few months ago my antenna fell over and is currently pointing to the ground, or at least to the steps on my back porch. When it fell I lost a few channels (still will recognize more than forty) and most of the channels I watch still come in just fine. I did lose the station that is 35 miles away.

Now I DO need to use an additional antenna amplifier and I have tried several different models with differing amounts of gain. Sometimes it is worse with more gain and some times it is better. I've tried multiple antennae but the coupler ALWAYS throws in another problem in that I lose signal on certain channels while gaining on others to the point that I currently have the second antenna on a different tuner and recorder so it doesn't adversely affect the primary antenna and television. MAYBE getting my antenna higher would help but maybe not as I have tried it at different heights as well as moving it to different locations along the back side of my house. Amazingly, as little as two feet difference in altitude can make the difference between a signal strength of more than 6 to less than one on any particular channel. Horizontal movement is almost as critical. But one thing I know for certain, I am NOT going back to cable, no matter what.
 
 

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