Diy lamp grounding question


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Old 05-19-16, 01:35 PM
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Diy lamp grounding question

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I plan on making this lamp as i have a basic background in wiring outlets lights and switches to code in the US. My maon concern after reading the comments section is that most lamps arent grounded and this one being all metal could be a problem.

My question is could this be grounded by running a 3prong cord from the outlet to the lamp and then screwing the ground wire into the pipe frame as the main concern is the frame getting hot due to a lose wire. Would this be enough or would it have to be pigtailed to each bulb socket as well?
 
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Old 05-19-16, 01:45 PM
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A lot of metal lamps are not grounded. You should use a polarized plug. Grounding the pipe would be a good safety precaution but the lamp holders are probably not designed to be grounded and in any event primarily made of non conductive materials.
 
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Old 05-19-16, 01:52 PM
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Do they sell diy polarized plugs? Or maybe i'd have to cut into one. I understand they prevent shock but i dont understand how since there is still no ground wire. Are you able to answer my question about running a 3 prong from the outlet to the lamp and just wiring the ground wire to a screw on the frame? Wouldnt that bring the current out should a wire be exposed?
 
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Old 05-19-16, 02:06 PM
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If you want to use a 3 conductor cord and plug, you certainly can connect the green wire to the metal part of the lamp and that would be good thing to do safety wise.

Using a polarized plug allows you to make sure the shell part of the lamp socket, which is the easiest part to touch accidently, is connected to the neutral conductor rather than the hot conductor. This way it is safer if the shell contact is accidently touched, say while changing a bulb.

Actually grounding the metal part of the lamp protects adds a different kind of protection. Should a wire inside the lamp have defective insulation, or be damaged in some way and come in contact with the grounded metal lamp, the circuit breaker would blow, preventing the lamp from becoming a shock hazard. Good luck with your project!
 
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Old 05-19-16, 02:31 PM
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Ok thanks thats what I figured. It's just like grounding an outlet box incase a wire becomes loose and exposed except it's a pipe. Thanks for the info.
 
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Old 05-19-16, 03:23 PM
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Yes they sell polarized plugs but I'd suggest a polarized cord set. A bet neater with a molded on plug. Or a grounded cord set.

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