Photocell and wiring


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Old 06-17-16, 11:32 AM
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Photocell and wiring

Several weeks ago, my sister and I noticed that the lights outside the garage which are attached to a dusk to dawn photocell sensor on the side of the house were not coming on at night time unless we tapped the sensor with our thumbs. After tapping it, they would work just fine and turn off at daylight. So we decided to replace that photocell sensor unit altogether with a https://www.amazon.com/Hyde-photocel...words=hyde+25w hoping that would fix the problem with lights outside the garage coming on at night time by using the included photocell sensor in the Hyde unit, as well as having the bright light on the side of the house which was very dark at night. We noticed that the photocell unit we replaced had 4 wires(black, white, ground attached to the cover, and red) attached to the house and garage lamps wiring, but the Hyde lamp we bought only had 3 wires( black, white, and ground) We attached the wiring following the way it was done by the house builder(white from lamps with white from house box and white from the Hyde lamp; ground from Hyde lamp to ground from house box, but the extra black wire inside the box( we guessed it was from the lamps outside the garage), which were attached to the red wire on the photocell we removed, we taped it and covered with a plastic cap and left it alone inside the box. The Hyde lamp works just fine coming on at dusk and turning off at dawn and provides an excellent bright white light, but the lights outside the garage are not coming on at all. Is this because of the black wire we left alone inside the box or did we do something else wrong with the wiring?
Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Pam
 
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Old 06-17-16, 12:06 PM
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Is this because of the black wire we left alone inside the box...?
Yes. I cannot tell from the poor instruction sheet posted on the Amazon page if that lamp assembly has any way to attach wiring for additional lights. If there is, it would be an additional wire from the photocell module inside the enclosure that goes to the LED driver module. If it exists it would be some color other than white, grey or green. This is the wire that you would connect the now loose black to.

Maybe if you posted a picture of the "guts" of this lamp I could give you better instructions.
 
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Old 06-17-16, 12:27 PM
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Thank you so much for your reponse. I was just hoping it would be as simple as to just connect that wire left behind to either the neutral(white) or directly to the black. You can tell I am not very handy when it comes to electrical work.
I am gonna try to get a picture of the inside of the lamp right now and post it
 
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Old 06-17-16, 12:48 PM
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I managed to take these pics of the inside of the lamp

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Last edited by PJmax; 06-17-16 at 11:50 PM. Reason: removed extra pics
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Old 06-17-16, 01:00 PM
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Connecting that free black to the white would do nothing. Connecting it to the other black would cause the now dark lights to be on continuously.

I can't tell from the pictures but it MIGHT work to connect to the red that connects to the LED board. The possible pitfalls are that LEDs are usually considered to be direct current devices and depending on the particular fixture that red wire may be direct current and/or it may be something other than 120 volts alternating current which is needed for the other light(s). The other pitfall is that IF the red wire is outputting 120 volts AC its Ampacity (a measure of how many lamps of a particular size it will light) may be fairly low and only enough to supply the LED module.

If it were mine I might thoroughly study the circuit boards and take some measurements with a meter to determine if I could connect the other lamps. For you, I advise that you either replace the now non-working lights with photocell models or to install a new photocell near the new lamp fixture to allow connection to both the power source and the now disconnected black wire. If you choose the former the now free black would connect to the other black wires in the new fixture.
 
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Old 06-17-16, 01:14 PM
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Thank you so much for the explanation. I think we have a better idea now of how this work and what to look for exactly.
 
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Old 06-17-16, 11:54 PM
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The LED fixture, as do most, probably uses a low voltage photocell. It is designed as a stand alone fixture. You supply it power and that's it. There is no provision for remote light hookup.

You removed a 120v photocell and installed a photocell controlled light. That photocell was, and still is, needed to control your other lights.
 
 

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