Can't turn off electricity


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Old 07-01-16, 05:44 PM
J
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Can't turn off electricity

I attached a picture of the wall switch that controls the electricity for a ceiling fan that stopped working. The two switches on the left are each connected to different breakers and it appears the switch on the right is as well but no matter how many breakers I turn off I can't seem to get the electricity to the fan to turn off. I am using one of those voltage checkers that flashes if electricity is still running. Is it possible that for some reason the fan is showing electricity because it is getting some from a different circuit somehow? I don't want to call an electrician just to try to change the pull switch (my assumption for what's wrong). Additionally, the third light switch (which runs the fan) only runs the fan so I can't figure out if it's off by other lights being off at the same time. Does anyone have a suggestion for how to figure out what circuit the fan is on?
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Old 07-01-16, 05:56 PM
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A none contact tester is useless for this one, go buy a real volt ohm meter, even a cheap $15.00 tester would be better then what your using.
 
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Old 07-01-16, 05:57 PM
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I am using one of those voltage checkers that flashes if electricity is still running.
That is your first problem. Give it to your kid to play with. They are prone to false positives because they react to electromagnetic field that may or may not be caused by real voltage.

For testing for voltage an analog not digital multimeter is best but you can also use a neon test light or solenoid tester. A cheap $8-$15 analog multimeter will do a good job. Depending on the way the switch is wired there may or may not be a good way to measure power at the switch. If power comes in there then that is where to measure but if it comes in at the fan you should measure there.

Your picture is rotated does it need to be rotated clockwise or counterclockwise to be correct.
 
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Old 07-01-16, 07:01 PM
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If you're using your "tester" at that switch box then from what you've told us there are several circuits that ALL need to be shut off for that switchbox to show completely dead.

You might be able to use that tester at the fan canopy.
 
 

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