Wiring power source for two pendant lights in parallel

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Old 09-12-16, 12:22 PM
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Wiring power source for two pendant lights in parallel

I'm looking to hang two pendant lights over an island and just wanted some discussion/confirmation that it would be appropriate to wire them as I am planning to.

The two lights are designed to be hardwired to a switch. Currently there is a florescent light there (typical of the ones you would find with a drop ceiling) that I will be replacing with the pendants, and is supplied by 18 gauge wire on a 15amp circuit. The lamps are also wired with 18 gauge. My thoughts are just to cut the ends of the two lamps and wire them to the power source in parallel by joining the hot and neutral to the same power source joined by a wirenut as crudely illustrated below... Is this the best way of doing this / safest way? Are there any other concerns I should be looking at? The circuit is far from overloaded at this point, and the bulbs will be LED anyhow, so there shouldn't be a ton of strain placed on the circuit.

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Old 09-12-16, 02:18 PM
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Your diagram is correct but house wire on a 15 amp circuit is #14 or greater. Fixture wire size is determined by different rules. Any wire you add is house wire and must be #14 minimum and done according to code.
 
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Old 09-13-16, 05:55 AM
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Replace the 18AWG with 14AWG

Thanks for the response, just for my clarity, the entire circuit would need the 18 gauge replaced with 14 gauge up to the wiring for the pendants? So the 18 gauge in the lamp is OK, just not the 18 gauge that's currently coming from the junction box, right?
 
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Old 09-13-16, 06:03 AM
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Yes, you need to replace the cable feeding the lights.
It's commonly called Romex (a brand name), any hardware store sells it.

Each light needs to have a wiring box.
 
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Old 09-13-16, 06:29 AM
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Thanks Handyone,

In the diagram I posted here, placing each wire nut into a box probably wouldn't cut it in regards to the light having its own box would it? I'll need to do some splicing..
 
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Old 09-13-16, 01:23 PM
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Each light needs a box and all connections need to be in the boxes. Power from the house switch goes to the first box. NM-b (AKA Romex) goes to the second box and the second pendant is connected there.

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Last edited by ray2047; 09-13-16 at 01:54 PM.
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Old 09-15-16, 12:55 PM
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That is incredibly helpful. Thank you for taking the time on that, it makes everything perfectly clear
 
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Old 09-19-16, 05:39 AM
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What to do with the ground wire?

Everything is now all wired up and working great, however, each pendant light is equipped with a ground wire, while the junction box supplying power has only a hot and a neutral. Should I just wirenut each one off in their boxes, or should I use the ground screw hole in the electrical box and wrap it around that?

If the neutral wires were to screw up someday and the power starts flowing to the ground wire, wouldn't that allow the current to flow through the actual conduit and electrocute the person touching it? Is it safer to not use the ground in this case?

How can I test if the actual conduit is grounded to the breaker?
 

Last edited by kkamin; 09-19-16 at 06:04 AM.
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Old 09-19-16, 08:05 AM
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If the conduit is grounded to the breaker you would a dead short, use a multi meter to test hot to the conduit or box,if it is indeed grounded you should read 120 volts,you can then connect the ground from the fixture to the ground screw in the box.
 
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