Ceiling Fan Light


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Old 09-17-16, 06:22 PM
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Ceiling Fan Light

We have a hunter ceiling fan and our light stopped working. It is connected to a Lutron Light and Fan switch (Controls fan speed and Dimmer). I replaced this and it did not solve the problem. After some searching on the Internet I found that all of these fans have problems with the Voltage limiter. Basically to comply with government mandates this box is wired in and will not allow you to put larger than 40 watt bulbs in.

According to a few videos and posts I removed this limiter in the light. This not only allows the lights to work again but I was able to put dimmable LED's in the fan and they do not flicker like they used to.

Now I am not an electrician so here is where my question comes in. With the light and fan off my non contact voltage sensor lights up when near the fan. My thinking was...if I should not do this at least when the lights and fan were off I would not have to worry....I am wondering if I should just replace the entire fan to ease the worrying....or am I just overly cautious? Why is there power in the fan with the switches off? Anyone have any experience with these? Why is it 2016 and most of the switches and fans only say they are compatible with incandescent? I go to my hardware stores and you can barely find them anymore. Thanks in advance with any advice.
 
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Old 09-17-16, 06:40 PM
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With the light and fan off my non contact voltage sensor lights up when near the fan.
Non contact testers measure the presence of an electromagnetic field not voltage. Things other than significant voltage can cause them to react.
 
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Old 09-18-16, 03:18 AM
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Why is there power in the fan with the switches off
If power comes in at the ceiling box, then all you have at the switches are switch loops. It will be normal for there to be an electromagnetic field at the ceiling box in that instance. If you work on it, be sure to remove the power from the breaker, and not from the switch.
 
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Old 09-18-16, 01:31 PM
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I am 99% sure that power does not come in at the fan. We had an electrician put it in and there was no power or even access above the ceiling. So we tapped of an existing switch and brought it to the ceiling. There are three wires (4 counting the ground) leaving and going out the conduit to the fan. I assume I have to use a volt meter to check?
 
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Old 09-18-16, 01:37 PM
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I assume I have to use a volt meter to check?
Yes, preferably analog not digital. A $8-$15 analog multimeter will do well.
 
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Old 09-18-16, 01:54 PM
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Now for a stupid question. With the switch off I can just put the probes on the + and - and should get a reading?
 
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Old 09-18-16, 02:19 PM
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AC has no plus or minus. Always best to measure voltage with the wires disconnected.
 
 

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